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Changes of motor deactivation regions in patients with intracranial lesions.

Lee SH, Koh JS, Ryu CW, Jahng GH - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Bottom Line: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions.Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions. Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.

Methods: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a motor task were obtained from 27 intracranial lesion patients (mean age, 57.3 years; range 15-78 years) who had various kinds of brain tumors. The BOLD fMRI data for each patient were evaluated to obtain activation or deactivation regions. The distinctive deactivation regions from intracranial lesion patients were evaluated by comparing to the literature reports.

Results: THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

Conclusion: There is increasing interest in human brain function using fMRI. The authors report the brain function migrations and changes that occur in patients with intracranial lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of motor task-induced activation differences in patient with cavernous hemangioma. Voxels showing significant brain activation during left hand motor task shown in yellow. Voxels showing significantly reduced activation for the same task shown in light-blue. Deactivations were observed in prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulated, precuneus, and postcentral gyrus.
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Figure 1: Map of motor task-induced activation differences in patient with cavernous hemangioma. Voxels showing significant brain activation during left hand motor task shown in yellow. Voxels showing significantly reduced activation for the same task shown in light-blue. Deactivations were observed in prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulated, precuneus, and postcentral gyrus.

Mentions: In response to non-dominant (left-hand) motor task, there were widespread deactivations of left postcentral gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate gyri as well as right posterior cingulate, precuneus and middle temporal gyrus in most patients. Similar deactivations were observed in response to the dominant (right-hand) motor task, including areas in the bilateral posterior cingulate, left temporal lobe and cuneus as well as right pre-and postcentral gyri, and precuneus (Fig. 1).


Changes of motor deactivation regions in patients with intracranial lesions.

Lee SH, Koh JS, Ryu CW, Jahng GH - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Map of motor task-induced activation differences in patient with cavernous hemangioma. Voxels showing significant brain activation during left hand motor task shown in yellow. Voxels showing significantly reduced activation for the same task shown in light-blue. Deactivations were observed in prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulated, precuneus, and postcentral gyrus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921271&req=5

Figure 1: Map of motor task-induced activation differences in patient with cavernous hemangioma. Voxels showing significant brain activation during left hand motor task shown in yellow. Voxels showing significantly reduced activation for the same task shown in light-blue. Deactivations were observed in prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulated, precuneus, and postcentral gyrus.
Mentions: In response to non-dominant (left-hand) motor task, there were widespread deactivations of left postcentral gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate gyri as well as right posterior cingulate, precuneus and middle temporal gyrus in most patients. Similar deactivations were observed in response to the dominant (right-hand) motor task, including areas in the bilateral posterior cingulate, left temporal lobe and cuneus as well as right pre-and postcentral gyri, and precuneus (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions.Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions. Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.

Methods: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a motor task were obtained from 27 intracranial lesion patients (mean age, 57.3 years; range 15-78 years) who had various kinds of brain tumors. The BOLD fMRI data for each patient were evaluated to obtain activation or deactivation regions. The distinctive deactivation regions from intracranial lesion patients were evaluated by comparing to the literature reports.

Results: THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

Conclusion: There is increasing interest in human brain function using fMRI. The authors report the brain function migrations and changes that occur in patients with intracranial lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus