Limits...
Metabolic Benefits of Six-month Thiamine Supplementation in Patients With and Without Diabetes Mellitus Type 2.

Al-Attas O, Al-Daghri N, Alokail M, Abd-Alrahman S, Vinodson B, Sabico S - Clin Med Insights Endocrinol Diabetes (2014)

Bottom Line: Anthropometrics and metabolic profiles were measured routinely.In all groups, there was a significant decrease in total cholesterol after three months (p = 0.03) as well as in HDL cholesterol after six months of thiamine supplementation (p = 0.009).Significant improvements were also observed in the mean serum levels of creatinine (p = 0.001), as well as thiamine and its derivatives in both serum and urinary levels across follow-up visits (p-values 0.002 and <0.001, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ; Biomarkers Research Program, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ; Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Thiamine deficiency has been documented to be prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus, and correction of thiamine deficiency in this population may provide beneficial effects in several cardiometabolic parameters, including prevention of impending complications secondary to chronic hyperglycemia. In this interventional study, we aim to determine whether thiamine supplementation is associated with cardiometabolic improvements in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2). A total of 86 subjects (60 DMT2 and 26 age- and BMI-matched controls) were included and were given thiamine supplements (100 mg/day) for six months. Anthropometrics and metabolic profiles were measured routinely. Serum thiamine and its derivatives were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. In all groups, there was a significant decrease in total cholesterol after three months (p = 0.03) as well as in HDL cholesterol after six months of thiamine supplementation (p = 0.009). Significant improvements were also observed in the mean serum levels of creatinine (p = 0.001), as well as thiamine and its derivatives in both serum and urinary levels across follow-up visits (p-values 0.002 and <0.001, respectively). In the DMT2 group, improvements were observed in lipid profile (mean serum LDL and total cholesterol with p-values 0.008 and 0.006, respectively), serum thiamine (p < 0.001), TMP (p < 0.001), TDP (p < 0.001), urinary thiamine (p < 0.001) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001). Thiamine supplementation is a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with DMT2. Longer clinical trials are needed to determine its protective effect in DMT2 complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum thiamine according to follow-up visits (all groups).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921172&req=5

f2-cmed-7-2014-001: Serum thiamine according to follow-up visits (all groups).

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the chromatogram of thiamine and its derivatives in both fortified and subjects’ samples. Table 1 shows the clinical profile of all subjects according to follow up. Comparisons showed significant decrease in total cholesterol after three months (p = 0.03) as well as HDL-cholesterol after six months of thiamine supplementation (p = 0.009). Significant improvements were also observed in the mean serum levels of creatinine (p = 0.001). With regards to thiamine and its derivatives, there was a significant increase in both serum and urinary thiamine levels across follow-up visits (p-values 0.002 and <0.001, respectively; see Fig. 2), and this was in parallel with the increased mean levels of serum TDP and TMP (p-values 0.009 and <0.001, respectively; see Figs. 3 and 4). No significant changes were observed among the anthropometric indices, and borderline significant variations were noted in mean serum levels of albumin and calcium (p-values 0.07 and 0.09, respectively; see Table 1). We then divided the subjects according to presence of DMT2. Mean serum thiamine was not significantly different between control and DMT2 groups (not shown in table). Table 2 shows the clinical and metabolic parameters of control subjects according to various time points. Significant improvement was seen in the mean serum creatinine levels (p < 0.001) during the 1st and 2nd follow-up as compared to baseline and this was in parallel with the significantly increased urinary excretion of thiamine (p < 0.001). The rest of the parameters were not significantly different from one another. Table 3 shows the comparisons among the DMT2 subjects. As opposed to the control subjects, more improvements were observed in terms of lipid profile (mean serum LDL- and total cholesterol, with p-values 0.008 and 0.006, respectively), serum thiamine (p < 0.001), TMP (p < 0.001), TDP (p < 0.001), urinary thiamine (p < 0.001) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001). Other parameters demonstrated no significant changes over time.


Metabolic Benefits of Six-month Thiamine Supplementation in Patients With and Without Diabetes Mellitus Type 2.

Al-Attas O, Al-Daghri N, Alokail M, Abd-Alrahman S, Vinodson B, Sabico S - Clin Med Insights Endocrinol Diabetes (2014)

Serum thiamine according to follow-up visits (all groups).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921172&req=5

f2-cmed-7-2014-001: Serum thiamine according to follow-up visits (all groups).
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the chromatogram of thiamine and its derivatives in both fortified and subjects’ samples. Table 1 shows the clinical profile of all subjects according to follow up. Comparisons showed significant decrease in total cholesterol after three months (p = 0.03) as well as HDL-cholesterol after six months of thiamine supplementation (p = 0.009). Significant improvements were also observed in the mean serum levels of creatinine (p = 0.001). With regards to thiamine and its derivatives, there was a significant increase in both serum and urinary thiamine levels across follow-up visits (p-values 0.002 and <0.001, respectively; see Fig. 2), and this was in parallel with the increased mean levels of serum TDP and TMP (p-values 0.009 and <0.001, respectively; see Figs. 3 and 4). No significant changes were observed among the anthropometric indices, and borderline significant variations were noted in mean serum levels of albumin and calcium (p-values 0.07 and 0.09, respectively; see Table 1). We then divided the subjects according to presence of DMT2. Mean serum thiamine was not significantly different between control and DMT2 groups (not shown in table). Table 2 shows the clinical and metabolic parameters of control subjects according to various time points. Significant improvement was seen in the mean serum creatinine levels (p < 0.001) during the 1st and 2nd follow-up as compared to baseline and this was in parallel with the significantly increased urinary excretion of thiamine (p < 0.001). The rest of the parameters were not significantly different from one another. Table 3 shows the comparisons among the DMT2 subjects. As opposed to the control subjects, more improvements were observed in terms of lipid profile (mean serum LDL- and total cholesterol, with p-values 0.008 and 0.006, respectively), serum thiamine (p < 0.001), TMP (p < 0.001), TDP (p < 0.001), urinary thiamine (p < 0.001) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001). Other parameters demonstrated no significant changes over time.

Bottom Line: Anthropometrics and metabolic profiles were measured routinely.In all groups, there was a significant decrease in total cholesterol after three months (p = 0.03) as well as in HDL cholesterol after six months of thiamine supplementation (p = 0.009).Significant improvements were also observed in the mean serum levels of creatinine (p = 0.001), as well as thiamine and its derivatives in both serum and urinary levels across follow-up visits (p-values 0.002 and <0.001, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ; Biomarkers Research Program, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ; Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Thiamine deficiency has been documented to be prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus, and correction of thiamine deficiency in this population may provide beneficial effects in several cardiometabolic parameters, including prevention of impending complications secondary to chronic hyperglycemia. In this interventional study, we aim to determine whether thiamine supplementation is associated with cardiometabolic improvements in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2). A total of 86 subjects (60 DMT2 and 26 age- and BMI-matched controls) were included and were given thiamine supplements (100 mg/day) for six months. Anthropometrics and metabolic profiles were measured routinely. Serum thiamine and its derivatives were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. In all groups, there was a significant decrease in total cholesterol after three months (p = 0.03) as well as in HDL cholesterol after six months of thiamine supplementation (p = 0.009). Significant improvements were also observed in the mean serum levels of creatinine (p = 0.001), as well as thiamine and its derivatives in both serum and urinary levels across follow-up visits (p-values 0.002 and <0.001, respectively). In the DMT2 group, improvements were observed in lipid profile (mean serum LDL and total cholesterol with p-values 0.008 and 0.006, respectively), serum thiamine (p < 0.001), TMP (p < 0.001), TDP (p < 0.001), urinary thiamine (p < 0.001) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001). Thiamine supplementation is a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with DMT2. Longer clinical trials are needed to determine its protective effect in DMT2 complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus