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Manual versus Automated Rodent Behavioral Assessment: Comparing Efficacy and Ease of Bederson and Garcia Neurological Deficit Scores to an Open Field Video-Tracking System.

Desland FA, Afzal A, Warraich Z, Mocco J - J Cent Nerv Syst Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Results obtained from the manual Bederson and Garcia scales did not show significant differences between pre- and post-stroke animals in a small cohort.When using the same cohort, however, post-stroke data obtained from automated open field analysis showed significant differences in several parameters.These early data indicate use of automated open field analysis software may provide a more sensitive assessment when compared to traditional Bederson and Garcia scales.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

ABSTRACT
Animal models of stroke have been crucial in advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. Currently, the standards for determining neurological deficit in rodents are the Bederson and Garcia scales, manual assessments scoring animals based on parameters ranked on a narrow scale of severity. Automated open field analysis of a live-video tracking system that analyzes animal behavior may provide a more sensitive test. Results obtained from the manual Bederson and Garcia scales did not show significant differences between pre- and post-stroke animals in a small cohort. When using the same cohort, however, post-stroke data obtained from automated open field analysis showed significant differences in several parameters. Furthermore, large cohort analysis also demonstrated increased sensitivity with automated open field analysis versus the Bederson and Garcia scales. These early data indicate use of automated open field analysis software may provide a more sensitive assessment when compared to traditional Bederson and Garcia scales.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Total distance moved and the velocity following stroke. Animals were placed in an open field and allowed to freely move around. Ethovision XT software was used to determine the total distance moved by each animal in cm and their maximum velocity in cm/s. (A) Post-stroke animal exhibited a significant decrease in the total distance moved compared to pre-stroke. (B) The velocity at which the animals moved poststroke was significantly lower compared to prestroke.Note: *P < 0.05.
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f3-jcnsd-6-2014-007: Total distance moved and the velocity following stroke. Animals were placed in an open field and allowed to freely move around. Ethovision XT software was used to determine the total distance moved by each animal in cm and their maximum velocity in cm/s. (A) Post-stroke animal exhibited a significant decrease in the total distance moved compared to pre-stroke. (B) The velocity at which the animals moved poststroke was significantly lower compared to prestroke.Note: *P < 0.05.

Mentions: The distance and velocity of the animals’ movements were quantified as an assessment of mobility. After stroke, there was a significant decrease in the distance moved (pre-stroke, 3861 ± 752 cm versus post-stroke, 1411 ± 348 cm) as well as the velocity (pre-stroke, 102 ± 9 cm/s versus post-stroke, 63 ± 7 cm/s) (Fig. 3).


Manual versus Automated Rodent Behavioral Assessment: Comparing Efficacy and Ease of Bederson and Garcia Neurological Deficit Scores to an Open Field Video-Tracking System.

Desland FA, Afzal A, Warraich Z, Mocco J - J Cent Nerv Syst Dis (2014)

Total distance moved and the velocity following stroke. Animals were placed in an open field and allowed to freely move around. Ethovision XT software was used to determine the total distance moved by each animal in cm and their maximum velocity in cm/s. (A) Post-stroke animal exhibited a significant decrease in the total distance moved compared to pre-stroke. (B) The velocity at which the animals moved poststroke was significantly lower compared to prestroke.Note: *P < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921024&req=5

f3-jcnsd-6-2014-007: Total distance moved and the velocity following stroke. Animals were placed in an open field and allowed to freely move around. Ethovision XT software was used to determine the total distance moved by each animal in cm and their maximum velocity in cm/s. (A) Post-stroke animal exhibited a significant decrease in the total distance moved compared to pre-stroke. (B) The velocity at which the animals moved poststroke was significantly lower compared to prestroke.Note: *P < 0.05.
Mentions: The distance and velocity of the animals’ movements were quantified as an assessment of mobility. After stroke, there was a significant decrease in the distance moved (pre-stroke, 3861 ± 752 cm versus post-stroke, 1411 ± 348 cm) as well as the velocity (pre-stroke, 102 ± 9 cm/s versus post-stroke, 63 ± 7 cm/s) (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Results obtained from the manual Bederson and Garcia scales did not show significant differences between pre- and post-stroke animals in a small cohort.When using the same cohort, however, post-stroke data obtained from automated open field analysis showed significant differences in several parameters.These early data indicate use of automated open field analysis software may provide a more sensitive assessment when compared to traditional Bederson and Garcia scales.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

ABSTRACT
Animal models of stroke have been crucial in advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. Currently, the standards for determining neurological deficit in rodents are the Bederson and Garcia scales, manual assessments scoring animals based on parameters ranked on a narrow scale of severity. Automated open field analysis of a live-video tracking system that analyzes animal behavior may provide a more sensitive test. Results obtained from the manual Bederson and Garcia scales did not show significant differences between pre- and post-stroke animals in a small cohort. When using the same cohort, however, post-stroke data obtained from automated open field analysis showed significant differences in several parameters. Furthermore, large cohort analysis also demonstrated increased sensitivity with automated open field analysis versus the Bederson and Garcia scales. These early data indicate use of automated open field analysis software may provide a more sensitive assessment when compared to traditional Bederson and Garcia scales.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus