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Spontaneous radial nerve palsy subsequent to non-traumatic neuroma.

Ebrahimpour A, Nazerani S, Tavakoli Darestani R, Khani S - Trauma Mon (2013)

Bottom Line: A 61 year-old man presented with the chief complaint of inability to extend the wrist and the fingers of the left hand which began suddenly the night before admission, following a three-week history of pain, numbness and tingling sensation of the affected extremity.He had no history of trauma to the extremity.Complete recovery of the hand and finger extension was achieved in nine months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Taleghani Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Spontaneous radial palsy is a not rare finding in hand clinics. The anatomy of the radial nerve renders it prone to pressure paralysis as often called "Saturday night palsy". This problem is a transient nerve lesion and an acute one but the case presented here is very unusual in that it seems this entity can also occur as an acute on chronic situation with neuroma formation.

Case presentation: A 61 year-old man presented with the chief complaint of inability to extend the wrist and the fingers of the left hand which began suddenly the night before admission, following a three-week history of pain, numbness and tingling sensation of the affected extremity. He had no history of trauma to the extremity. Electromyography revealed a severe conductive defect of the left radial nerve with significant axonal loss at the upper arm. Surgical exploration identified a neuroma of the radial nerve measuring 1.5 cm in length as the cause of the paralysis. The neuroma was removed and an end-to-end nerve coaption was performed.

Conclusions: Complete recovery of the hand and finger extension was achieved in nine months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Macroscopic View of the Lesion
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fig5310: Macroscopic View of the Lesion

Mentions: Surgery was done under general anesthesia and tourniquet control and the radial nerve was explored. The surgical findings were two sausage-shaped areas at the distal third of the nerve (Figure 1). A neuroma (1.5 cm in length) was excised and the two ends of the nerve were coapted under magnification using 6-0 prolene suture. The limb was placed in a splint at 60 degrees flexion with the shoulder in adduction. The excised nerve segment was submitted for pathological evaluation, which yielded a diagnosis of neuroma (Figure 2). The patient achieved complete recovery of upper extremity movements after 9 months.


Spontaneous radial nerve palsy subsequent to non-traumatic neuroma.

Ebrahimpour A, Nazerani S, Tavakoli Darestani R, Khani S - Trauma Mon (2013)

Macroscopic View of the Lesion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860672&req=5

fig5310: Macroscopic View of the Lesion
Mentions: Surgery was done under general anesthesia and tourniquet control and the radial nerve was explored. The surgical findings were two sausage-shaped areas at the distal third of the nerve (Figure 1). A neuroma (1.5 cm in length) was excised and the two ends of the nerve were coapted under magnification using 6-0 prolene suture. The limb was placed in a splint at 60 degrees flexion with the shoulder in adduction. The excised nerve segment was submitted for pathological evaluation, which yielded a diagnosis of neuroma (Figure 2). The patient achieved complete recovery of upper extremity movements after 9 months.

Bottom Line: A 61 year-old man presented with the chief complaint of inability to extend the wrist and the fingers of the left hand which began suddenly the night before admission, following a three-week history of pain, numbness and tingling sensation of the affected extremity.He had no history of trauma to the extremity.Complete recovery of the hand and finger extension was achieved in nine months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Taleghani Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Spontaneous radial palsy is a not rare finding in hand clinics. The anatomy of the radial nerve renders it prone to pressure paralysis as often called "Saturday night palsy". This problem is a transient nerve lesion and an acute one but the case presented here is very unusual in that it seems this entity can also occur as an acute on chronic situation with neuroma formation.

Case presentation: A 61 year-old man presented with the chief complaint of inability to extend the wrist and the fingers of the left hand which began suddenly the night before admission, following a three-week history of pain, numbness and tingling sensation of the affected extremity. He had no history of trauma to the extremity. Electromyography revealed a severe conductive defect of the left radial nerve with significant axonal loss at the upper arm. Surgical exploration identified a neuroma of the radial nerve measuring 1.5 cm in length as the cause of the paralysis. The neuroma was removed and an end-to-end nerve coaption was performed.

Conclusions: Complete recovery of the hand and finger extension was achieved in nine months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus