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Deep femoral artery branch pseudoaneurysm after orthopedic procedure requiring surgical treatment: a case report.

Khoshnevis J, Sobhiyeh MR, Fallah Zavareh M - Trauma Mon (2012)

Bottom Line: Pseudoaneurysms (PSA) of deep femoral artery (DFA) have been reported following penetrating and blunt trauma to the thigh and orthopedic procedures of the proximal femur.We describe a case of pseudoaneurysm of DFA as a late complication of limb trauma which was confirmed by exploration in an urgent surgery.After two operations successful surgical repair was performed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Vascular Surgery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Shohada Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysms (PSA) of deep femoral artery (DFA) have been reported following penetrating and blunt trauma to the thigh and orthopedic procedures of the proximal femur. We describe a case of pseudoaneurysm of DFA as a late complication of limb trauma which was confirmed by exploration in an urgent surgery. After two operations successful surgical repair was performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Extravasation of contrast of deep femoral artery branch
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fig604: Extravasation of contrast of deep femoral artery branch

Mentions: A 25 year-old male motorcyclist had sustained multiple injuries in a road traffic accident including closed fracture of left femoral shaft and lateral condyle and head trauma 1.5 months before recent admission to our hospital. The fracture had been initially treated with an Ilizarov apparatus; however, recently he underwent bleeding around the left lateral femoral surgical incision and was thus referred to our hospital (Figure 1). On arrival, he was hypotensive and had tachycardia. On the examination, his left limb was found atrophic and a 35 cm incision of an orthopedic procedure was lateral to the femur (from proximal toward distal) with granulation tissue and blood oozing out of it with no trill or bruit. Motor examination of fingers and ankle showed impaired dorsiflexion; however the distal pulses in the leg were normal. After stablization of hemodynamic status, exploration of the wound revealed a large hematoma with a bleeding spot from an injured branch of DFA (lateral circumflex femoral artery) and a false aneurysm at that site with communication to DFA. The hematoma was evacuated and the injured branch of deep femoral artery was ligated and bleeding ceased. Ten days after the surgery the patient bled again around his left femur and after performing a contrast-enhanced angiography (Figure 2), in classic exploration (medial approach) of common and deep femoral arteries bleeding from the same branch of DFA was seen. We ligated the injured branch at the point of its communication with DFA where it had originated (Figure 3). The patient had good recovery without further bleeding episodes.


Deep femoral artery branch pseudoaneurysm after orthopedic procedure requiring surgical treatment: a case report.

Khoshnevis J, Sobhiyeh MR, Fallah Zavareh M - Trauma Mon (2012)

Extravasation of contrast of deep femoral artery branch
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860639&req=5

fig604: Extravasation of contrast of deep femoral artery branch
Mentions: A 25 year-old male motorcyclist had sustained multiple injuries in a road traffic accident including closed fracture of left femoral shaft and lateral condyle and head trauma 1.5 months before recent admission to our hospital. The fracture had been initially treated with an Ilizarov apparatus; however, recently he underwent bleeding around the left lateral femoral surgical incision and was thus referred to our hospital (Figure 1). On arrival, he was hypotensive and had tachycardia. On the examination, his left limb was found atrophic and a 35 cm incision of an orthopedic procedure was lateral to the femur (from proximal toward distal) with granulation tissue and blood oozing out of it with no trill or bruit. Motor examination of fingers and ankle showed impaired dorsiflexion; however the distal pulses in the leg were normal. After stablization of hemodynamic status, exploration of the wound revealed a large hematoma with a bleeding spot from an injured branch of DFA (lateral circumflex femoral artery) and a false aneurysm at that site with communication to DFA. The hematoma was evacuated and the injured branch of deep femoral artery was ligated and bleeding ceased. Ten days after the surgery the patient bled again around his left femur and after performing a contrast-enhanced angiography (Figure 2), in classic exploration (medial approach) of common and deep femoral arteries bleeding from the same branch of DFA was seen. We ligated the injured branch at the point of its communication with DFA where it had originated (Figure 3). The patient had good recovery without further bleeding episodes.

Bottom Line: Pseudoaneurysms (PSA) of deep femoral artery (DFA) have been reported following penetrating and blunt trauma to the thigh and orthopedic procedures of the proximal femur.We describe a case of pseudoaneurysm of DFA as a late complication of limb trauma which was confirmed by exploration in an urgent surgery.After two operations successful surgical repair was performed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Vascular Surgery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Shohada Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysms (PSA) of deep femoral artery (DFA) have been reported following penetrating and blunt trauma to the thigh and orthopedic procedures of the proximal femur. We describe a case of pseudoaneurysm of DFA as a late complication of limb trauma which was confirmed by exploration in an urgent surgery. After two operations successful surgical repair was performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus