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Prevention in the Military: Early Results of an Environmental Strategy

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ABSTRACT

The workplace offers advantages as a setting for interventions that result in primary prevention of alcohol abuse. Such programs have the potential to reach broad audiences and populations that would otherwise not receive prevention programs and, thereby, benefit both the employee and employer. Researchers have implemented and evaluated a variety of workplace alcohol problem prevention efforts in recent years, including programs focused on health promotion, social health promotion, brief interventions, and changing the work environment. Although some studies reported significant reductions in alcohol use outcomes, additional research with a stronger and integrated methodological approach is needed. The field of workplace alcohol prevention also might benefit from a guiding framework, such as the one proposed in this article.

No MeSH data available.


Past-month heavy alcohol use among full-time workers aged 18 to 64, by industry categories: 2002−2004 combined.SOURCE: SAMHSA Analytic Series: A-29. No permission required.Larson, S. L.; Eyerman, J.; Foster, M.S. and Gfroerer, J.C. Worker Substance Use and Workplace Policies and Programs (DHHS Publication No. SMA 07–4273, Analytic Series A–29). Rockville MD: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, 2007.
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f1-arh-34-2-175: Past-month heavy alcohol use among full-time workers aged 18 to 64, by industry categories: 2002−2004 combined.SOURCE: SAMHSA Analytic Series: A-29. No permission required.Larson, S. L.; Eyerman, J.; Foster, M.S. and Gfroerer, J.C. Worker Substance Use and Workplace Policies and Programs (DHHS Publication No. SMA 07–4273, Analytic Series A–29). Rockville MD: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, 2007.

Mentions: Workplace programs designed to prevent and reduce alcohol problems can potentially benefit the employee, the employer, and society in general. In 2007, 8.8 percent of full-time workers overall reported heavy alcohol use (i.e., they consumed five or more drinks on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days), and 30.2 percent reported binge drinking (i.e., consuming five or more drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days) (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 2009). As demonstrated in figure 1, when broken down by occupational types, heavy-drinking rates can be much higher in some industries.


Prevention in the Military: Early Results of an Environmental Strategy
Past-month heavy alcohol use among full-time workers aged 18 to 64, by industry categories: 2002−2004 combined.SOURCE: SAMHSA Analytic Series: A-29. No permission required.Larson, S. L.; Eyerman, J.; Foster, M.S. and Gfroerer, J.C. Worker Substance Use and Workplace Policies and Programs (DHHS Publication No. SMA 07–4273, Analytic Series A–29). Rockville MD: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, 2007.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860571&req=5

f1-arh-34-2-175: Past-month heavy alcohol use among full-time workers aged 18 to 64, by industry categories: 2002−2004 combined.SOURCE: SAMHSA Analytic Series: A-29. No permission required.Larson, S. L.; Eyerman, J.; Foster, M.S. and Gfroerer, J.C. Worker Substance Use and Workplace Policies and Programs (DHHS Publication No. SMA 07–4273, Analytic Series A–29). Rockville MD: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, 2007.
Mentions: Workplace programs designed to prevent and reduce alcohol problems can potentially benefit the employee, the employer, and society in general. In 2007, 8.8 percent of full-time workers overall reported heavy alcohol use (i.e., they consumed five or more drinks on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days), and 30.2 percent reported binge drinking (i.e., consuming five or more drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days) (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 2009). As demonstrated in figure 1, when broken down by occupational types, heavy-drinking rates can be much higher in some industries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The workplace offers advantages as a setting for interventions that result in primary prevention of alcohol abuse. Such programs have the potential to reach broad audiences and populations that would otherwise not receive prevention programs and, thereby, benefit both the employee and employer. Researchers have implemented and evaluated a variety of workplace alcohol problem prevention efforts in recent years, including programs focused on health promotion, social health promotion, brief interventions, and changing the work environment. Although some studies reported significant reductions in alcohol use outcomes, additional research with a stronger and integrated methodological approach is needed. The field of workplace alcohol prevention also might benefit from a guiding framework, such as the one proposed in this article.

No MeSH data available.