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Translating family-focused prevention science into public health impact.

Spoth RL, Schainker LL, Hiller-Sturmhöefel S - Alcohol Res Health (2011)

Bottom Line: This type of translation can be enhanced through four sets of translational impact factors-effectiveness of interventions, extensiveness of their population coverage, efficiency of interventions, and engagement of eligible populations, with sustained quality intervention implementation.Findings from studies conducted by researchers at the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute and other empirical work highlight the importance of these factors.This model fits well within a comprehensive strategic framework for promoting effective prevention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.

ABSTRACT
Underage drinking is a pervasive problem in the United States, with serious consequences for youth, families, communities, and society as a whole. Family-focused preventive interventions for children and adolescents have shown potential for reducing underage drinking and other problem behaviors. Research findings indicate that clear advances have been made, in terms of both the number of evidence-based interventions available, and in the quality of the methods used to evaluate them. To fully reap the benefits of such preventive interventions and achieve public health impact, the findings of family-focused preventive intervention science must be translated into real-world, community practices. This type of translation can be enhanced through four sets of translational impact factors-effectiveness of interventions, extensiveness of their population coverage, efficiency of interventions, and engagement of eligible populations, with sustained quality intervention implementation. Findings from studies conducted by researchers at the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute and other empirical work highlight the importance of these factors. A model for community- university partnerships has been developed that potentially can facilitate the dissemination and public health impact of universal interventions to prevent underage drinking and other problem behaviors. This model fits well within a comprehensive strategic framework for promoting effective prevention.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of a strategy for plotting a course for public health impact through family-focused preventive intervention science.SOURCE: Adapted from Spoth 2008. Used with permission from Wiley-Blackwell Publishers.
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f1-arh-34-2-188: Overview of a strategy for plotting a course for public health impact through family-focused preventive intervention science.SOURCE: Adapted from Spoth 2008. Used with permission from Wiley-Blackwell Publishers.

Mentions: For effective translation of evidence-based interventions into widespread practice that can have a real public health impact, four general steps can be helpful to consider (see figure 1). A first step is to enhance the translation of preventive interventions by considering not only the scientifically sound development and testing of the program but also considering, very early on, how organizational and systems factors specific to various practice settings ultimately will influence adoption, implementation, and sustainability of the program. A second step involves careful attention to specific sets of factors that influence the translation of interventions into widespread practice. These factors, also known as the “four Es of intervention impact,” will be described in more detail in the following sections. As a third step, mechanisms can be developed to facilitate the translation from research into practice—for example, practitioner–scientist partnerships and networks (these also will be discussed later in this article). Finally, a fourth step provides direction to the translational process by establishing appropriate guidelines and standards for translation-related research (e.g., standards on how intervention outcomes should be measured and how public health impact-oriented research should be reported and disseminated). Following all of these steps helps to ensure that effective family-focused interventions are developed and transferred into community practices that can have a positive impact on the future of adolescents and, consequently, a substantial public health impact.


Translating family-focused prevention science into public health impact.

Spoth RL, Schainker LL, Hiller-Sturmhöefel S - Alcohol Res Health (2011)

Overview of a strategy for plotting a course for public health impact through family-focused preventive intervention science.SOURCE: Adapted from Spoth 2008. Used with permission from Wiley-Blackwell Publishers.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860561&req=5

f1-arh-34-2-188: Overview of a strategy for plotting a course for public health impact through family-focused preventive intervention science.SOURCE: Adapted from Spoth 2008. Used with permission from Wiley-Blackwell Publishers.
Mentions: For effective translation of evidence-based interventions into widespread practice that can have a real public health impact, four general steps can be helpful to consider (see figure 1). A first step is to enhance the translation of preventive interventions by considering not only the scientifically sound development and testing of the program but also considering, very early on, how organizational and systems factors specific to various practice settings ultimately will influence adoption, implementation, and sustainability of the program. A second step involves careful attention to specific sets of factors that influence the translation of interventions into widespread practice. These factors, also known as the “four Es of intervention impact,” will be described in more detail in the following sections. As a third step, mechanisms can be developed to facilitate the translation from research into practice—for example, practitioner–scientist partnerships and networks (these also will be discussed later in this article). Finally, a fourth step provides direction to the translational process by establishing appropriate guidelines and standards for translation-related research (e.g., standards on how intervention outcomes should be measured and how public health impact-oriented research should be reported and disseminated). Following all of these steps helps to ensure that effective family-focused interventions are developed and transferred into community practices that can have a positive impact on the future of adolescents and, consequently, a substantial public health impact.

Bottom Line: This type of translation can be enhanced through four sets of translational impact factors-effectiveness of interventions, extensiveness of their population coverage, efficiency of interventions, and engagement of eligible populations, with sustained quality intervention implementation.Findings from studies conducted by researchers at the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute and other empirical work highlight the importance of these factors.This model fits well within a comprehensive strategic framework for promoting effective prevention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.

ABSTRACT
Underage drinking is a pervasive problem in the United States, with serious consequences for youth, families, communities, and society as a whole. Family-focused preventive interventions for children and adolescents have shown potential for reducing underage drinking and other problem behaviors. Research findings indicate that clear advances have been made, in terms of both the number of evidence-based interventions available, and in the quality of the methods used to evaluate them. To fully reap the benefits of such preventive interventions and achieve public health impact, the findings of family-focused preventive intervention science must be translated into real-world, community practices. This type of translation can be enhanced through four sets of translational impact factors-effectiveness of interventions, extensiveness of their population coverage, efficiency of interventions, and engagement of eligible populations, with sustained quality intervention implementation. Findings from studies conducted by researchers at the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute and other empirical work highlight the importance of these factors. A model for community- university partnerships has been developed that potentially can facilitate the dissemination and public health impact of universal interventions to prevent underage drinking and other problem behaviors. This model fits well within a comprehensive strategic framework for promoting effective prevention.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus