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Maternal risk factors for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: not as simple as it might seem.

May PA, Gossage JP - Alcohol Res Health (2011)

Bottom Line: Gathering information about drinking during pregnancy is one of the most difficult aspects of studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD).This article reviews highlights from the literature on maternal risk factors for FASD and illustrates that maternal risk is multidimensional, including factors related to quantity, frequency, and timing of alcohol exposure; maternal age; number of pregnancies; number of times the mother has given birth; the mother's body size; nutrition; socioeconomic status; metabolism; religion; spirituality; depression; other drug use; and social relationships.More research is needed to more clearly define what type of individual behavioral, physical, and genetic factors are most likely to lead to having children with FASD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of New Mexico Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Gathering information about drinking during pregnancy is one of the most difficult aspects of studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). This information is critical to linking specific risk factors to any particular diagnosis within the FASD continuum. This article reviews highlights from the literature on maternal risk factors for FASD and illustrates that maternal risk is multidimensional, including factors related to quantity, frequency, and timing of alcohol exposure; maternal age; number of pregnancies; number of times the mother has given birth; the mother's body size; nutrition; socioeconomic status; metabolism; religion; spirituality; depression; other drug use; and social relationships. More research is needed to more clearly define what type of individual behavioral, physical, and genetic factors are most likely to lead to having children with FASD.

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Commonly Recognized Maternal Risk Factors for FASD from the Literature: A Public Health Variable Summary.
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f2-arh-34-1-15: Commonly Recognized Maternal Risk Factors for FASD from the Literature: A Public Health Variable Summary.

Mentions: As described above, many maternal factors affect FASD risk; figure 2 provides a useful scheme for organizing these variables. Using a standard public health classification (MacMahon and Pugh 1970) of associated and causal factors to organize the multiple, interdisciplinary variables that influence maternal risk for FASD in humans, a list emerges that may assist in clarifying our understanding of the multiple maternal influences on FASD. This schematic listing also may serve to guide further research, prevention, and intervention programming (May 1995). The three topical categories of variables are the host (the individual woman), the agent (alcohol as a teratogenic agent exposed to the fetus via the mother), and the environment (the social and natural setting of the pregnant woman’s life).


Maternal risk factors for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: not as simple as it might seem.

May PA, Gossage JP - Alcohol Res Health (2011)

Commonly Recognized Maternal Risk Factors for FASD from the Literature: A Public Health Variable Summary.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860552&req=5

f2-arh-34-1-15: Commonly Recognized Maternal Risk Factors for FASD from the Literature: A Public Health Variable Summary.
Mentions: As described above, many maternal factors affect FASD risk; figure 2 provides a useful scheme for organizing these variables. Using a standard public health classification (MacMahon and Pugh 1970) of associated and causal factors to organize the multiple, interdisciplinary variables that influence maternal risk for FASD in humans, a list emerges that may assist in clarifying our understanding of the multiple maternal influences on FASD. This schematic listing also may serve to guide further research, prevention, and intervention programming (May 1995). The three topical categories of variables are the host (the individual woman), the agent (alcohol as a teratogenic agent exposed to the fetus via the mother), and the environment (the social and natural setting of the pregnant woman’s life).

Bottom Line: Gathering information about drinking during pregnancy is one of the most difficult aspects of studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD).This article reviews highlights from the literature on maternal risk factors for FASD and illustrates that maternal risk is multidimensional, including factors related to quantity, frequency, and timing of alcohol exposure; maternal age; number of pregnancies; number of times the mother has given birth; the mother's body size; nutrition; socioeconomic status; metabolism; religion; spirituality; depression; other drug use; and social relationships.More research is needed to more clearly define what type of individual behavioral, physical, and genetic factors are most likely to lead to having children with FASD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of New Mexico Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Gathering information about drinking during pregnancy is one of the most difficult aspects of studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). This information is critical to linking specific risk factors to any particular diagnosis within the FASD continuum. This article reviews highlights from the literature on maternal risk factors for FASD and illustrates that maternal risk is multidimensional, including factors related to quantity, frequency, and timing of alcohol exposure; maternal age; number of pregnancies; number of times the mother has given birth; the mother's body size; nutrition; socioeconomic status; metabolism; religion; spirituality; depression; other drug use; and social relationships. More research is needed to more clearly define what type of individual behavioral, physical, and genetic factors are most likely to lead to having children with FASD.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus