Limits...
Focus on: Alcohol and the liver.

Szabo G, Mandrekar P - Alcohol Res Health (2010)

Bottom Line: Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism.Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver.Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts.

ABSTRACT
Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism. Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver. Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease. This article tracks advances in alcohol-related liver disease research over the past 40 years and describes how these discoveries are helping scientists to gain insight into therapeutic targets that may help to combat this life-threatening disease.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Progression of alcoholic liver disease in heavy drinkers.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f1-arh-33-1_2-87: Progression of alcoholic liver disease in heavy drinkers.

Mentions: In addition to producing cytokines, activated Kupffer cells are the major source of ROS in the liver, which, in large amounts, can lead to oxidative stress. Research has found that oxidative stress not only affects fatty acid oxidation and key cellular function but also triggers activation of hepatic macrophages, thus adding to the inflammatory cascade (Mandrekar and Szabo 2009; Wheeler at al. 2001). These studies provide a strong basis for the current model of ALD (figures 1 and 2). These findings also provide possible mechanisms for developing therapeutics for ALD.


Focus on: Alcohol and the liver.

Szabo G, Mandrekar P - Alcohol Res Health (2010)

Progression of alcoholic liver disease in heavy drinkers.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860520&req=5

f1-arh-33-1_2-87: Progression of alcoholic liver disease in heavy drinkers.
Mentions: In addition to producing cytokines, activated Kupffer cells are the major source of ROS in the liver, which, in large amounts, can lead to oxidative stress. Research has found that oxidative stress not only affects fatty acid oxidation and key cellular function but also triggers activation of hepatic macrophages, thus adding to the inflammatory cascade (Mandrekar and Szabo 2009; Wheeler at al. 2001). These studies provide a strong basis for the current model of ALD (figures 1 and 2). These findings also provide possible mechanisms for developing therapeutics for ALD.

Bottom Line: Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism.Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver.Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts.

ABSTRACT
Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism. Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver. Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease. This article tracks advances in alcohol-related liver disease research over the past 40 years and describes how these discoveries are helping scientists to gain insight into therapeutic targets that may help to combat this life-threatening disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus