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HIV risk and the alcohol environment: advancing an ecological epidemiology for HIV/AIDS.

Scribner R, Theall KP, Simonsen N, Robinson W - Alcohol Res Health (2010)

Bottom Line: A socioecological framework has been proposed for HIV/AIDS, including influences at the individual level, the interpersonal level, the neighborhood level, and the societal level.This framework provides the basis for a conceptual model with specific risk factors at each of these levels and cross-level associations.The nature of the associations also is important, in particular the assumption that the neighborhood alcohol environment exerts its effect on HIV risk through both direct and indirect pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana.

ABSTRACT
The study of individual risk factors is inadequate to address the current public health challenges associated with HIV/AIDS. Rather, an ecological epidemiological study of HIV/AIDS is needed to address these challenges. A socioecological framework has been proposed for HIV/AIDS, including influences at the individual level, the interpersonal level, the neighborhood level, and the societal level. This framework provides the basis for a conceptual model with specific risk factors at each of these levels and cross-level associations. The nature of the associations also is important, in particular the assumption that the neighborhood alcohol environment exerts its effect on HIV risk through both direct and indirect pathways.

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Socioecological framework for HIV/AIDS risk.
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f1-arh-33-3-179: Socioecological framework for HIV/AIDS risk.

Mentions: March and Susser (2006) originated the term ecological epidemiology, an approach to complex disease systems that characterizes disease risk in terms of multiple causative factors contributing in both social and physical contexts at the population level. Their insights inspired a number of researchers to propose ecological frameworks for a variety of diseases, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (Dahlberg and Krug 2002; DiClemente et al. 2005). These frameworks build on each other and typically include multiple levels of influence portrayed as concentric circles typically beginning with the individual level, followed by the interpersonal level, the neighborhood or community level, and finally the societal level. (Bronfenbrenner 1979; DiClemente et al. 2005) (see figure 1). These frameworks are based on the idea is that individuals operate within spheres of social influence and therefore prevention strategies should include a continuum of activities that address multiple spheres of influence. Frameworks of this type are generic and therefore do not provide measurable constructs that characterize social contexts and are believed to influence a particular health outcome. The conceptual model described below is designed to make explicit both the constructs that characterize the various spheres of social influence (i.e., social contexts) and the hypothetical relationships between them as they relate to alcohol and HIV risk so that hypotheses can be tested. In a sense, this represents the beginning of an ecological epidemiology of HIV.


HIV risk and the alcohol environment: advancing an ecological epidemiology for HIV/AIDS.

Scribner R, Theall KP, Simonsen N, Robinson W - Alcohol Res Health (2010)

Socioecological framework for HIV/AIDS risk.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860511&req=5

f1-arh-33-3-179: Socioecological framework for HIV/AIDS risk.
Mentions: March and Susser (2006) originated the term ecological epidemiology, an approach to complex disease systems that characterizes disease risk in terms of multiple causative factors contributing in both social and physical contexts at the population level. Their insights inspired a number of researchers to propose ecological frameworks for a variety of diseases, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (Dahlberg and Krug 2002; DiClemente et al. 2005). These frameworks build on each other and typically include multiple levels of influence portrayed as concentric circles typically beginning with the individual level, followed by the interpersonal level, the neighborhood or community level, and finally the societal level. (Bronfenbrenner 1979; DiClemente et al. 2005) (see figure 1). These frameworks are based on the idea is that individuals operate within spheres of social influence and therefore prevention strategies should include a continuum of activities that address multiple spheres of influence. Frameworks of this type are generic and therefore do not provide measurable constructs that characterize social contexts and are believed to influence a particular health outcome. The conceptual model described below is designed to make explicit both the constructs that characterize the various spheres of social influence (i.e., social contexts) and the hypothetical relationships between them as they relate to alcohol and HIV risk so that hypotheses can be tested. In a sense, this represents the beginning of an ecological epidemiology of HIV.

Bottom Line: A socioecological framework has been proposed for HIV/AIDS, including influences at the individual level, the interpersonal level, the neighborhood level, and the societal level.This framework provides the basis for a conceptual model with specific risk factors at each of these levels and cross-level associations.The nature of the associations also is important, in particular the assumption that the neighborhood alcohol environment exerts its effect on HIV risk through both direct and indirect pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana.

ABSTRACT
The study of individual risk factors is inadequate to address the current public health challenges associated with HIV/AIDS. Rather, an ecological epidemiological study of HIV/AIDS is needed to address these challenges. A socioecological framework has been proposed for HIV/AIDS, including influences at the individual level, the interpersonal level, the neighborhood level, and the societal level. This framework provides the basis for a conceptual model with specific risk factors at each of these levels and cross-level associations. The nature of the associations also is important, in particular the assumption that the neighborhood alcohol environment exerts its effect on HIV risk through both direct and indirect pathways.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus