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A developmental perspective on underage alcohol use.

Masten AS, Faden VB, Zucker RA, Spear LP - Alcohol Res Health (2009)

Bottom Line: Moreover, many of the effects that alcohol use has on the drinker, in both the short and long term, depend on the developmental timing of alcohol use or exposure.Finally, many developmental connections have been observed in the risk and protective factors that predict the likelihood of problem alcohol use in young people.Therefore, efforts to understand and address underage drinking would benefit from a developmental perspective, and the general principles of developmental psychopathology offer a useful conceptual framework for research and prevention concerned with underage drinking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

ABSTRACT
Underage alcohol use can be viewed as a developmental phenomenon because many kinds of developmental changes and expectations appear to influence this behavior and also because it has consequences for development. Data on alcohol use, abuse, and dependence show clear age-related patterns. Moreover, many of the effects that alcohol use has on the drinker, in both the short and long term, depend on the developmental timing of alcohol use or exposure. Finally, many developmental connections have been observed in the risk and protective factors that predict the likelihood of problem alcohol use in young people. Therefore, efforts to understand and address underage drinking would benefit from a developmental perspective, and the general principles of developmental psychopathology offer a useful conceptual framework for research and prevention concerned with underage drinking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Past-month alcohol use (any, binge, heavy) by age.NOTE: *Binge is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion.**Heavy Drinking is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion on five or more of the past 30 days.SOURCE: SAMHSA, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2007.
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f2-arh-32-1-3: Past-month alcohol use (any, binge, heavy) by age.NOTE: *Binge is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion.**Heavy Drinking is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion on five or more of the past 30 days.SOURCE: SAMHSA, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2007.

Mentions: Alcohol use, problems, abuse, and dependence are related to age in multiple ways. Although some children begin drinking in elementary school, alcohol use (defined as drinking a whole drink) typically begins in early adolescence, around ages 12–14 (Faden 2006). Between ages 12 and 21, rates of alcohol use and binge alcohol use increase sharply. For example, data from the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) indicate that the proportion of youth who have ever drunk alcohol rises steeply during adolescence, leveling off around age 21 (see figure 1). Data from the same study (see figure 2) indicate that all levels of past-month alcohol usage increase steadily from ages 12 to 21, including any alcohol use (defined as drinking at least one whole drink in the past month), binge use (defined as drinking four or more drinks on one occasion), and heavy use (defined as drinking five or more drinks on five or more days within the past month).


A developmental perspective on underage alcohol use.

Masten AS, Faden VB, Zucker RA, Spear LP - Alcohol Res Health (2009)

Past-month alcohol use (any, binge, heavy) by age.NOTE: *Binge is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion.**Heavy Drinking is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion on five or more of the past 30 days.SOURCE: SAMHSA, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2007.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860500&req=5

f2-arh-32-1-3: Past-month alcohol use (any, binge, heavy) by age.NOTE: *Binge is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion.**Heavy Drinking is defined as five or more drinks on an occasion on five or more of the past 30 days.SOURCE: SAMHSA, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2007.
Mentions: Alcohol use, problems, abuse, and dependence are related to age in multiple ways. Although some children begin drinking in elementary school, alcohol use (defined as drinking a whole drink) typically begins in early adolescence, around ages 12–14 (Faden 2006). Between ages 12 and 21, rates of alcohol use and binge alcohol use increase sharply. For example, data from the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) indicate that the proportion of youth who have ever drunk alcohol rises steeply during adolescence, leveling off around age 21 (see figure 1). Data from the same study (see figure 2) indicate that all levels of past-month alcohol usage increase steadily from ages 12 to 21, including any alcohol use (defined as drinking at least one whole drink in the past month), binge use (defined as drinking four or more drinks on one occasion), and heavy use (defined as drinking five or more drinks on five or more days within the past month).

Bottom Line: Moreover, many of the effects that alcohol use has on the drinker, in both the short and long term, depend on the developmental timing of alcohol use or exposure.Finally, many developmental connections have been observed in the risk and protective factors that predict the likelihood of problem alcohol use in young people.Therefore, efforts to understand and address underage drinking would benefit from a developmental perspective, and the general principles of developmental psychopathology offer a useful conceptual framework for research and prevention concerned with underage drinking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

ABSTRACT
Underage alcohol use can be viewed as a developmental phenomenon because many kinds of developmental changes and expectations appear to influence this behavior and also because it has consequences for development. Data on alcohol use, abuse, and dependence show clear age-related patterns. Moreover, many of the effects that alcohol use has on the drinker, in both the short and long term, depend on the developmental timing of alcohol use or exposure. Finally, many developmental connections have been observed in the risk and protective factors that predict the likelihood of problem alcohol use in young people. Therefore, efforts to understand and address underage drinking would benefit from a developmental perspective, and the general principles of developmental psychopathology offer a useful conceptual framework for research and prevention concerned with underage drinking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus