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The role of selected factors in the development and consequences of alcohol dependence.

Gilbertson R, Prather R, Nixon SJ - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

Bottom Line: This article examines these factors and considers how they interact with each other.This complexity reinforces the need for both animal and human studies and suggests multiple factors that may be sensitive to differential prevention, intervention, and treatment efforts.Thus, it is imperative that hypothesis-driven research designs be directed to identifying the relative potency of these factors and their interactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Addiction Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

ABSTRACT
Gender, family history, comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders, and age all influence a person's risk for alcoholism. In addition, these factors interact with alcoholism to influence neurocognitive functioning following detoxification. This article examines these factors and considers how they interact with each other. This complexity reinforces the need for both animal and human studies and suggests multiple factors that may be sensitive to differential prevention, intervention, and treatment efforts. Thus, it is imperative that hypothesis-driven research designs be directed to identifying the relative potency of these factors and their interactions.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Concordances for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Prevalence of alcoholism in twins and twin concordance of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins for alcoholism in a study of 8,935 pairs of Swedish male twins. Adapted from data reported by Kendler et al. (1992). Squares demarcate 1 standard error (McGue 1999).SOURCE: Derived from: 1999 American Psychological Society, figure 1, p. 110. McGue, M. The behavioral genetics of alcoholism. Current Directions in Psychological Science 8(4):109–115, 1999.
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f2-arh-31-4-389: Concordances for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Prevalence of alcoholism in twins and twin concordance of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins for alcoholism in a study of 8,935 pairs of Swedish male twins. Adapted from data reported by Kendler et al. (1992). Squares demarcate 1 standard error (McGue 1999).SOURCE: Derived from: 1999 American Psychological Society, figure 1, p. 110. McGue, M. The behavioral genetics of alcoholism. Current Directions in Psychological Science 8(4):109–115, 1999.

Mentions: With continued and more broadly developed research, these assumptions have been modified. Widely cited studies using male and female monozygotic and dizygotic twins suggest that genes, environment, and their interaction are potent contributors to the development of alcohol dependence in both genders (Heath et al. 1997; Krueger et al. 2002; McGue 1997, 1999; Prescott and Kendler 1999; Sigvardsson et al. 1996) (see figure 2). Approximately 40 percent of the variance for alcoholism onset in men (Prescott and Kendler 1999) and 60 percent of this variance in women can be attributed to genes (Kendler et al. 1992).


The role of selected factors in the development and consequences of alcohol dependence.

Gilbertson R, Prather R, Nixon SJ - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

Concordances for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Prevalence of alcoholism in twins and twin concordance of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins for alcoholism in a study of 8,935 pairs of Swedish male twins. Adapted from data reported by Kendler et al. (1992). Squares demarcate 1 standard error (McGue 1999).SOURCE: Derived from: 1999 American Psychological Society, figure 1, p. 110. McGue, M. The behavioral genetics of alcoholism. Current Directions in Psychological Science 8(4):109–115, 1999.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860467&req=5

f2-arh-31-4-389: Concordances for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Prevalence of alcoholism in twins and twin concordance of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins for alcoholism in a study of 8,935 pairs of Swedish male twins. Adapted from data reported by Kendler et al. (1992). Squares demarcate 1 standard error (McGue 1999).SOURCE: Derived from: 1999 American Psychological Society, figure 1, p. 110. McGue, M. The behavioral genetics of alcoholism. Current Directions in Psychological Science 8(4):109–115, 1999.
Mentions: With continued and more broadly developed research, these assumptions have been modified. Widely cited studies using male and female monozygotic and dizygotic twins suggest that genes, environment, and their interaction are potent contributors to the development of alcohol dependence in both genders (Heath et al. 1997; Krueger et al. 2002; McGue 1997, 1999; Prescott and Kendler 1999; Sigvardsson et al. 1996) (see figure 2). Approximately 40 percent of the variance for alcoholism onset in men (Prescott and Kendler 1999) and 60 percent of this variance in women can be attributed to genes (Kendler et al. 1992).

Bottom Line: This article examines these factors and considers how they interact with each other.This complexity reinforces the need for both animal and human studies and suggests multiple factors that may be sensitive to differential prevention, intervention, and treatment efforts.Thus, it is imperative that hypothesis-driven research designs be directed to identifying the relative potency of these factors and their interactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Addiction Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

ABSTRACT
Gender, family history, comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders, and age all influence a person's risk for alcoholism. In addition, these factors interact with alcoholism to influence neurocognitive functioning following detoxification. This article examines these factors and considers how they interact with each other. This complexity reinforces the need for both animal and human studies and suggests multiple factors that may be sensitive to differential prevention, intervention, and treatment efforts. Thus, it is imperative that hypothesis-driven research designs be directed to identifying the relative potency of these factors and their interactions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus