Limits...
An epidemiologic analysis of co-occurring alcohol and drug use and disorders: findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

Falk D, Yi HY, Hiller-Sturmhöfel S - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of drug use, weekly drug use, and DUDs increased with increasing levels of alcohol consumption and the presence of AUDs.The proportion of people with AUDs who had a co-morbid DUD varied considerably by drug type.These findings have important implications for the development of prevention and intervention approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alcohol Epidemiologic Data System of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, operated by CSR, Incorporated, Arlington, Virginia.

ABSTRACT
The 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) sought to determine the prevalence of alcohol use and alcohol use disorders (AUDs), other drug use and drug use disorders (DUDs), and co-use and co-morbidity in the general adult U.S. population. Findings indicate that 5.6 percent of U.S. adults used both alcohol and drugs in the past year and that 1.1 percent had a co-morbid AUD and DUD. Alcohol use prevalence peaked between the ages of 25 and 44 and declined thereafter. The prevalence of other drug use, co-use, AUDs, DUDs, and co-morbid disorders was highest between the ages of 18 and 24 and declined steadily thereafter. Women and men showed similar trends for alcohol use, drug use, and co-use. Among ethnic/racial groups evaluated, Whites displayed the highest rates of alcohol use and American Indians/Alaskan Natives the highest rates of drug use. For AUDs, DUDs, and co-morbid disorders, rates were highest among American Indians/Alaskan Natives. The prevalence of drug use, weekly drug use, and DUDs increased with increasing levels of alcohol consumption and the presence of AUDs. The proportion of people with AUDs who had a co-morbid DUD varied considerably by drug type. These findings have important implications for the development of prevention and intervention approaches.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

A) Prevalence of past-year drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. B) Prevalence of past-year weekly drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. C) Prevalence of past-year drug use disorder by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC.NOTE: Data are drawn from Table 3. AA = Alcohol abuse; AD = Alcohol dependence; FD = Former drinker; H = Heavy drinker; L = Light drinker; LA = Lifetime abstainer; M = Moderate drinker.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860461&req=5

f3-arh-31-2-100: A) Prevalence of past-year drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. B) Prevalence of past-year weekly drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. C) Prevalence of past-year drug use disorder by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC.NOTE: Data are drawn from Table 3. AA = Alcohol abuse; AD = Alcohol dependence; FD = Former drinker; H = Heavy drinker; L = Light drinker; LA = Lifetime abstainer; M = Moderate drinker.

Mentions: NESARC data also demonstrate how drug use is related to the characteristics of alcohol consumption (i.e., lifetime abstainer; former drinker; light, moderate, or heavy drinker; alcohol abuse; and alcohol dependence). For all three drug measures—any drug use, weekly drug use, and any DUD—the rates increased monotonically with increasing levels of alcohol consumption and the presence of alcohol abuse and dependence (table 3, figures 3A–C). For instance, among both men and women, the prevalence of any drug use was lowest (i.e., around 1 percent) among lifetime alcohol abstainers, increased with levels of alcohol consumption, and peaked among alcohol-dependent people (about 43 percent for men and about 34 percent for women, respectively) (figure 3A). Similar positive trends also were observed between drinking characteristics and weekly drug use (figure 3B) or any DUD (figure 3C). The association between alcohol dependence and the three drug use measures was particularly strong compared with the other drinking levels and alcohol abuse. For example, alcohol-dependent men and women had much higher prevalence of drug use than lifetime alcohol abstainers, representing a 33 and 28 times increased risk for drug use, respectively.


An epidemiologic analysis of co-occurring alcohol and drug use and disorders: findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

Falk D, Yi HY, Hiller-Sturmhöfel S - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

A) Prevalence of past-year drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. B) Prevalence of past-year weekly drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. C) Prevalence of past-year drug use disorder by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC.NOTE: Data are drawn from Table 3. AA = Alcohol abuse; AD = Alcohol dependence; FD = Former drinker; H = Heavy drinker; L = Light drinker; LA = Lifetime abstainer; M = Moderate drinker.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860461&req=5

f3-arh-31-2-100: A) Prevalence of past-year drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. B) Prevalence of past-year weekly drug use by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC. C) Prevalence of past-year drug use disorder by past-year drinking characteristics and gender in the United States, 2001–2002 NESARC.NOTE: Data are drawn from Table 3. AA = Alcohol abuse; AD = Alcohol dependence; FD = Former drinker; H = Heavy drinker; L = Light drinker; LA = Lifetime abstainer; M = Moderate drinker.
Mentions: NESARC data also demonstrate how drug use is related to the characteristics of alcohol consumption (i.e., lifetime abstainer; former drinker; light, moderate, or heavy drinker; alcohol abuse; and alcohol dependence). For all three drug measures—any drug use, weekly drug use, and any DUD—the rates increased monotonically with increasing levels of alcohol consumption and the presence of alcohol abuse and dependence (table 3, figures 3A–C). For instance, among both men and women, the prevalence of any drug use was lowest (i.e., around 1 percent) among lifetime alcohol abstainers, increased with levels of alcohol consumption, and peaked among alcohol-dependent people (about 43 percent for men and about 34 percent for women, respectively) (figure 3A). Similar positive trends also were observed between drinking characteristics and weekly drug use (figure 3B) or any DUD (figure 3C). The association between alcohol dependence and the three drug use measures was particularly strong compared with the other drinking levels and alcohol abuse. For example, alcohol-dependent men and women had much higher prevalence of drug use than lifetime alcohol abstainers, representing a 33 and 28 times increased risk for drug use, respectively.

Bottom Line: The prevalence of drug use, weekly drug use, and DUDs increased with increasing levels of alcohol consumption and the presence of AUDs.The proportion of people with AUDs who had a co-morbid DUD varied considerably by drug type.These findings have important implications for the development of prevention and intervention approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alcohol Epidemiologic Data System of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, operated by CSR, Incorporated, Arlington, Virginia.

ABSTRACT
The 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) sought to determine the prevalence of alcohol use and alcohol use disorders (AUDs), other drug use and drug use disorders (DUDs), and co-use and co-morbidity in the general adult U.S. population. Findings indicate that 5.6 percent of U.S. adults used both alcohol and drugs in the past year and that 1.1 percent had a co-morbid AUD and DUD. Alcohol use prevalence peaked between the ages of 25 and 44 and declined thereafter. The prevalence of other drug use, co-use, AUDs, DUDs, and co-morbid disorders was highest between the ages of 18 and 24 and declined steadily thereafter. Women and men showed similar trends for alcohol use, drug use, and co-use. Among ethnic/racial groups evaluated, Whites displayed the highest rates of alcohol use and American Indians/Alaskan Natives the highest rates of drug use. For AUDs, DUDs, and co-morbid disorders, rates were highest among American Indians/Alaskan Natives. The prevalence of drug use, weekly drug use, and DUDs increased with increasing levels of alcohol consumption and the presence of AUDs. The proportion of people with AUDs who had a co-morbid DUD varied considerably by drug type. These findings have important implications for the development of prevention and intervention approaches.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus