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Diagnosing co-morbid drug use in patients with alcohol use disorders.

Arnaout B, Petrakis IL - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

Bottom Line: Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders (i.e., AOD abuse and dependence) commonly co-occur.This co-morbidity has important social, psychiatric, and medical consequences.Although making an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, especially in the context of multiple disorders, clinicians can adopt practices to improve their diagnostic accuracy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale University School of Medicine/VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut.

ABSTRACT
Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders (i.e., AOD abuse and dependence) commonly co-occur. This co-morbidity has important social, psychiatric, and medical consequences. Although making an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, especially in the context of multiple disorders, clinicians can adopt practices to improve their diagnostic accuracy. These practices include an empathic, accepting, and nonjudgmental stance that encourages patients to be honest and forthcoming in their self-report of alcohol use; being sensitive to the prevalence of substance use disorders in all patient populations and settings; and being familiar with diagnostic criteria.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders in the general population (left) and among those with 12-month alcohol use disorders (right).NOTE: 12-Month prevalence represents the prevalence of those meeting the diagnosis for a drug use disorder in the previous 12 months.SOURCE: 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (Stinson et al. 2005).
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f1-arh-31-2-148: The 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders in the general population (left) and among those with 12-month alcohol use disorders (right).NOTE: 12-Month prevalence represents the prevalence of those meeting the diagnosis for a drug use disorder in the previous 12 months.SOURCE: 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (Stinson et al. 2005).

Mentions: AOD use disorders have a high prevalence in the general population and frequently co-occur. In the 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), the 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders (i.e., the prevalence of those meeting the diagnosis for a drug use disorder in the previous 12 months) among those with 12-month alcohol use disorders was 13 percent (see figure 1). Conversely, the 12-month prevalence of alcohol use disorders among those with 12-month drug use disorders was 55.17 percent (Stinson et al. 2005). In the general population, the 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders was 2 percent (see figure 1) and the 12-month prevalence of alcohol use disorders was 8.46 percent (Stinson et al. 2005).


Diagnosing co-morbid drug use in patients with alcohol use disorders.

Arnaout B, Petrakis IL - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

The 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders in the general population (left) and among those with 12-month alcohol use disorders (right).NOTE: 12-Month prevalence represents the prevalence of those meeting the diagnosis for a drug use disorder in the previous 12 months.SOURCE: 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (Stinson et al. 2005).
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860455&req=5

f1-arh-31-2-148: The 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders in the general population (left) and among those with 12-month alcohol use disorders (right).NOTE: 12-Month prevalence represents the prevalence of those meeting the diagnosis for a drug use disorder in the previous 12 months.SOURCE: 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (Stinson et al. 2005).
Mentions: AOD use disorders have a high prevalence in the general population and frequently co-occur. In the 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), the 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders (i.e., the prevalence of those meeting the diagnosis for a drug use disorder in the previous 12 months) among those with 12-month alcohol use disorders was 13 percent (see figure 1). Conversely, the 12-month prevalence of alcohol use disorders among those with 12-month drug use disorders was 55.17 percent (Stinson et al. 2005). In the general population, the 12-month prevalence of drug use disorders was 2 percent (see figure 1) and the 12-month prevalence of alcohol use disorders was 8.46 percent (Stinson et al. 2005).

Bottom Line: Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders (i.e., AOD abuse and dependence) commonly co-occur.This co-morbidity has important social, psychiatric, and medical consequences.Although making an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, especially in the context of multiple disorders, clinicians can adopt practices to improve their diagnostic accuracy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale University School of Medicine/VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut.

ABSTRACT
Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders (i.e., AOD abuse and dependence) commonly co-occur. This co-morbidity has important social, psychiatric, and medical consequences. Although making an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, especially in the context of multiple disorders, clinicians can adopt practices to improve their diagnostic accuracy. These practices include an empathic, accepting, and nonjudgmental stance that encourages patients to be honest and forthcoming in their self-report of alcohol use; being sensitive to the prevalence of substance use disorders in all patient populations and settings; and being familiar with diagnostic criteria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus