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Shared mechanisms of alcohol and other drugs.

Cruz MT, Bajo M, Schweitzer P, Roberto M - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

Bottom Line: Thus, cannabis and opiates act via receptors intended for internally derived (i.e., endogenous) cannabinoid and opiate substances.In contrast, alcohol does not appear to activate specific receptors.However, alcohol influences the activity of many transmitter systems including GABA and endogenous opioids and cannabinoids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Committee on Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California.

ABSTRACT
Identifying the changes that occur in the brain as a result of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use is important to understanding the development of AOD addiction. The nerve cell signaling chemical (i.e., neurotransmitter) γ-aminobutync acid (GABA) plays an important role in the brain chemistry of addiction. Most drugs interact with binding molecules (i.e., receptors) for specific neurotransmitters and either block or facilitate binding at these receptors. Thus, cannabis and opiates act via receptors intended for internally derived (i.e., endogenous) cannabinoid and opiate substances. In contrast, alcohol does not appear to activate specific receptors. However, alcohol influences the activity of many transmitter systems including GABA and endogenous opioids and cannabinoids.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A) Neurons communicate by sending signals across microscopic gaps called synapses. These signals are conducted away from the neuron’s cell body by long slender projections called axons. B) Signal transmission across a synapse. A neuron sending a signal releases a neurotransmitter (shown as triangles and circles), which binds to a receptor on the surface of the receiving neuron. Receptors are proteins with unique shapes that fit a specific neurotransmitter, much like a lock and key.
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f4-arh-31-2-137: A) Neurons communicate by sending signals across microscopic gaps called synapses. These signals are conducted away from the neuron’s cell body by long slender projections called axons. B) Signal transmission across a synapse. A neuron sending a signal releases a neurotransmitter (shown as triangles and circles), which binds to a receptor on the surface of the receiving neuron. Receptors are proteins with unique shapes that fit a specific neurotransmitter, much like a lock and key.


Shared mechanisms of alcohol and other drugs.

Cruz MT, Bajo M, Schweitzer P, Roberto M - Alcohol Res Health (2008)

A) Neurons communicate by sending signals across microscopic gaps called synapses. These signals are conducted away from the neuron’s cell body by long slender projections called axons. B) Signal transmission across a synapse. A neuron sending a signal releases a neurotransmitter (shown as triangles and circles), which binds to a receptor on the surface of the receiving neuron. Receptors are proteins with unique shapes that fit a specific neurotransmitter, much like a lock and key.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860454&req=5

f4-arh-31-2-137: A) Neurons communicate by sending signals across microscopic gaps called synapses. These signals are conducted away from the neuron’s cell body by long slender projections called axons. B) Signal transmission across a synapse. A neuron sending a signal releases a neurotransmitter (shown as triangles and circles), which binds to a receptor on the surface of the receiving neuron. Receptors are proteins with unique shapes that fit a specific neurotransmitter, much like a lock and key.
Bottom Line: Thus, cannabis and opiates act via receptors intended for internally derived (i.e., endogenous) cannabinoid and opiate substances.In contrast, alcohol does not appear to activate specific receptors.However, alcohol influences the activity of many transmitter systems including GABA and endogenous opioids and cannabinoids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Committee on Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California.

ABSTRACT
Identifying the changes that occur in the brain as a result of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use is important to understanding the development of AOD addiction. The nerve cell signaling chemical (i.e., neurotransmitter) γ-aminobutync acid (GABA) plays an important role in the brain chemistry of addiction. Most drugs interact with binding molecules (i.e., receptors) for specific neurotransmitters and either block or facilitate binding at these receptors. Thus, cannabis and opiates act via receptors intended for internally derived (i.e., endogenous) cannabinoid and opiate substances. In contrast, alcohol does not appear to activate specific receptors. However, alcohol influences the activity of many transmitter systems including GABA and endogenous opioids and cannabinoids.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus