Limits...
Genetic and Genomic Web Resources for Research on Alcohol Use and Abuse

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

There are two major ways of publishing scientific data and results: (1) the standard peer-reviewed paper, which dates back to volume 1 of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society in 1665; and (2) online distribution of data, resources, and software using the Internet that dates back a mere 21 years to the first Web site at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) established by Tim Berners-Lee... Think of it as a free suite of genetics and statistics programs that happen to be loaded with genetic and genomic data sets, along with complimentary data on biological responses to alcohol and many other drugs. (For more information, see figure 1A and B) This is another NIAAA-funded project that offers a powerful tool for the integrative analysis of collections of lists of genes and their functional relationships... Like GeneWeaver this is a sophisticated tool for the analysis of sets of genes... It includes species as diverse as yeast, worms, and humans... The site started with a focus on gene expression patterns in the brain of the mouse; however, within the last year, it has expanded rapidly and now also covers gene expression in humans and non-human primates... Scientists interested in brain research should visit this site at least once to see the full power of Web services and Web science—it puts a massive research lab at your fingertips... Because of patient confidentiality it is not possible to directly access key data, as is the case for mouse and rat resources... Still this site provides a comprehensive overview of the data that have been generated and links to virtually all of the associated research papers... Non-human primates have proved to be strikingly faithful models of many aspects of alcoholism in humans, and they provide far better experimental control... This is an international initiative that is making major mutations (knock-outs) in every one of about 19,000 genes in the mammalian (murine) genome... NIAAA contributes to this effort, with a special focus on those genes known to be involved in brain function and suspected to modulate risk of alcoholism... This is a companion to the knockout project (above)... It provides information on how to obtain lines of mice that can be used to turn genes off in specific types of cells at different points in life.

No MeSH data available.


A genetic map of alcohol sedation/activation effects. The horizontal x-axis lists mouse chromosomes, from 1 to the left to chromosome X to the right. The large peak on chromosome 9—a so-called quantitative trait locus (QTL)—is the principal part of the mouse genome that modulates activation levels in females of this BXD family. This sharp peak (high LOD score of 5.0 on the y-axis) can be expanded in GeneNetwork and reveals approximately 160 genes at the peak between 67 and 87 megabases. This set of genes can then be analyzed in GeneWeaver, WebGestalt, COGA, and many other Web resources to evaluate which subsets are most likely to cause differences in response to alcohol, including the suspected alcohol candidate genes, serotonin 1B receptor (5HT1B) and RAB27A. Other features of this genetic map are explained on the Web site.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860403&req=5

f1B-arcr-34-3-378: A genetic map of alcohol sedation/activation effects. The horizontal x-axis lists mouse chromosomes, from 1 to the left to chromosome X to the right. The large peak on chromosome 9—a so-called quantitative trait locus (QTL)—is the principal part of the mouse genome that modulates activation levels in females of this BXD family. This sharp peak (high LOD score of 5.0 on the y-axis) can be expanded in GeneNetwork and reveals approximately 160 genes at the peak between 67 and 87 megabases. This set of genes can then be analyzed in GeneWeaver, WebGestalt, COGA, and many other Web resources to evaluate which subsets are most likely to cause differences in response to alcohol, including the suspected alcohol candidate genes, serotonin 1B receptor (5HT1B) and RAB27A. Other features of this genetic map are explained on the Web site.

Mentions: This is a comprehensive resource for learning about genetics, but users may need to read the help files, FAQs, or one of the references (Chesler et al., 2003; Grisham et al., 2010, www.lifescied.org/content/9/2/98.full.pdf). GeneNetwork is one of an interlinked trio of sites built up by NIAAA (GeneWeaver and WebGestalt are the other two) to house extensive data for human, monkey, rat, mouse, and fruit fly. It includes hundreds of data sets on responses to alcohol, particularly in a family of mice called the BXDs. Data are linked with powerful gene analysis and mapping tools. Think of it as a free suite of genetics and statistics programs that happen to be loaded with genetic and genomic data sets, along with complimentary data on biological responses to alcohol and many other drugs (Philip et al., 2010). (For more information, see figure 1A and B)


Genetic and Genomic Web Resources for Research on Alcohol Use and Abuse
A genetic map of alcohol sedation/activation effects. The horizontal x-axis lists mouse chromosomes, from 1 to the left to chromosome X to the right. The large peak on chromosome 9—a so-called quantitative trait locus (QTL)—is the principal part of the mouse genome that modulates activation levels in females of this BXD family. This sharp peak (high LOD score of 5.0 on the y-axis) can be expanded in GeneNetwork and reveals approximately 160 genes at the peak between 67 and 87 megabases. This set of genes can then be analyzed in GeneWeaver, WebGestalt, COGA, and many other Web resources to evaluate which subsets are most likely to cause differences in response to alcohol, including the suspected alcohol candidate genes, serotonin 1B receptor (5HT1B) and RAB27A. Other features of this genetic map are explained on the Web site.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860403&req=5

f1B-arcr-34-3-378: A genetic map of alcohol sedation/activation effects. The horizontal x-axis lists mouse chromosomes, from 1 to the left to chromosome X to the right. The large peak on chromosome 9—a so-called quantitative trait locus (QTL)—is the principal part of the mouse genome that modulates activation levels in females of this BXD family. This sharp peak (high LOD score of 5.0 on the y-axis) can be expanded in GeneNetwork and reveals approximately 160 genes at the peak between 67 and 87 megabases. This set of genes can then be analyzed in GeneWeaver, WebGestalt, COGA, and many other Web resources to evaluate which subsets are most likely to cause differences in response to alcohol, including the suspected alcohol candidate genes, serotonin 1B receptor (5HT1B) and RAB27A. Other features of this genetic map are explained on the Web site.
Mentions: This is a comprehensive resource for learning about genetics, but users may need to read the help files, FAQs, or one of the references (Chesler et al., 2003; Grisham et al., 2010, www.lifescied.org/content/9/2/98.full.pdf). GeneNetwork is one of an interlinked trio of sites built up by NIAAA (GeneWeaver and WebGestalt are the other two) to house extensive data for human, monkey, rat, mouse, and fruit fly. It includes hundreds of data sets on responses to alcohol, particularly in a family of mice called the BXDs. Data are linked with powerful gene analysis and mapping tools. Think of it as a free suite of genetics and statistics programs that happen to be loaded with genetic and genomic data sets, along with complimentary data on biological responses to alcohol and many other drugs (Philip et al., 2010). (For more information, see figure 1A and B)

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

There are two major ways of publishing scientific data and results: (1) the standard peer-reviewed paper, which dates back to volume 1 of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society in 1665; and (2) online distribution of data, resources, and software using the Internet that dates back a mere 21 years to the first Web site at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) established by Tim Berners-Lee... Think of it as a free suite of genetics and statistics programs that happen to be loaded with genetic and genomic data sets, along with complimentary data on biological responses to alcohol and many other drugs. (For more information, see figure 1A and B) This is another NIAAA-funded project that offers a powerful tool for the integrative analysis of collections of lists of genes and their functional relationships... Like GeneWeaver this is a sophisticated tool for the analysis of sets of genes... It includes species as diverse as yeast, worms, and humans... The site started with a focus on gene expression patterns in the brain of the mouse; however, within the last year, it has expanded rapidly and now also covers gene expression in humans and non-human primates... Scientists interested in brain research should visit this site at least once to see the full power of Web services and Web science—it puts a massive research lab at your fingertips... Because of patient confidentiality it is not possible to directly access key data, as is the case for mouse and rat resources... Still this site provides a comprehensive overview of the data that have been generated and links to virtually all of the associated research papers... Non-human primates have proved to be strikingly faithful models of many aspects of alcoholism in humans, and they provide far better experimental control... This is an international initiative that is making major mutations (knock-outs) in every one of about 19,000 genes in the mammalian (murine) genome... NIAAA contributes to this effort, with a special focus on those genes known to be involved in brain function and suspected to modulate risk of alcoholism... This is a companion to the knockout project (above)... It provides information on how to obtain lines of mice that can be used to turn genes off in specific types of cells at different points in life.

No MeSH data available.