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Subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum after tonsillectomy.

Koukoutsis G, Balatsouras DG, Ganelis P, Fassolis A, Moukos A, Katotomichelakis M, Kaberos A - Case Rep Otolaryngol (2013)

Bottom Line: Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of tonsillectomy that often resolves spontaneously but may progress to obstruct upper airways or spread to the thorax causing pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax.A case of a 21-year-old female undergoing routine adenotonsillectomy, who developed cervicofacial emphysema and pneumomediastinum, is presented.Possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Afentouli 1 & Zanni, 18536 Piraeus, Greece.

ABSTRACT
Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of tonsillectomy that often resolves spontaneously but may progress to obstruct upper airways or spread to the thorax causing pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax. The mechanisms by which subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum may develop after tonsillectomy are poorly understood. A case of a 21-year-old female undergoing routine adenotonsillectomy, who developed cervicofacial emphysema and pneumomediastinum, is presented. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Axial computed tomography of the chest at the level of the aortic arch reveals the presence of air in the mediastinum.
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fig4: Axial computed tomography of the chest at the level of the aortic arch reveals the presence of air in the mediastinum.

Mentions: A neck and chest X-ray revealed subcutaneous cervical emphysema (Figure 1) and a computed tomography scan of the neck (Figure 2) confirmed the diagnosis. A chest computed tomography performed simultaneously showed the presence of pneumomediastinum (Figures 3 and 4). Since the patient did not present with respiratory distress and hemodynamically was stable, conservative management was decided. A combination of broad-spectrum antibiotics was administered and the patient was restricted to bed rest and instructed to refrain from coughing. Further course was uneventful, the subcutaneous emphysema decreased substantially, and a new chest plain radiography showed absence of air. The patient was discharged a week after surgery and follow-up examinations did not reveal any abnormal findings.


Subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum after tonsillectomy.

Koukoutsis G, Balatsouras DG, Ganelis P, Fassolis A, Moukos A, Katotomichelakis M, Kaberos A - Case Rep Otolaryngol (2013)

Axial computed tomography of the chest at the level of the aortic arch reveals the presence of air in the mediastinum.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860152&req=5

fig4: Axial computed tomography of the chest at the level of the aortic arch reveals the presence of air in the mediastinum.
Mentions: A neck and chest X-ray revealed subcutaneous cervical emphysema (Figure 1) and a computed tomography scan of the neck (Figure 2) confirmed the diagnosis. A chest computed tomography performed simultaneously showed the presence of pneumomediastinum (Figures 3 and 4). Since the patient did not present with respiratory distress and hemodynamically was stable, conservative management was decided. A combination of broad-spectrum antibiotics was administered and the patient was restricted to bed rest and instructed to refrain from coughing. Further course was uneventful, the subcutaneous emphysema decreased substantially, and a new chest plain radiography showed absence of air. The patient was discharged a week after surgery and follow-up examinations did not reveal any abnormal findings.

Bottom Line: Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of tonsillectomy that often resolves spontaneously but may progress to obstruct upper airways or spread to the thorax causing pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax.A case of a 21-year-old female undergoing routine adenotonsillectomy, who developed cervicofacial emphysema and pneumomediastinum, is presented.Possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Afentouli 1 & Zanni, 18536 Piraeus, Greece.

ABSTRACT
Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of tonsillectomy that often resolves spontaneously but may progress to obstruct upper airways or spread to the thorax causing pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax. The mechanisms by which subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum may develop after tonsillectomy are poorly understood. A case of a 21-year-old female undergoing routine adenotonsillectomy, who developed cervicofacial emphysema and pneumomediastinum, is presented. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus