Limits...
Idiopathic oesophageal dysmotility disorder: stridor secondary to megaesophagus.

Natesh BG, Caton N, Kim D, Shetty A - Case Rep Otolaryngol (2013)

Bottom Line: We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder.We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Alexandra Hospital, Southwick Hill Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO6 3LY, UK.

ABSTRACT
We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder. We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gastroscopy showing dilated and tortuous oesophagus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860127&req=5

fig2: Gastroscopy showing dilated and tortuous oesophagus.

Mentions: Flexible oesophogastroduodenoscopy was performed the following day to examine the lower oesophagus. This revealed a grossly dilated and tortuous oesophagus (Figure 2) without the presence of an oesophageal stricture. Barium swallow was also performed and demonstrated a uniformly dilated, atonic oesophagus without evidence of achalasia (Figures 3 and 4).


Idiopathic oesophageal dysmotility disorder: stridor secondary to megaesophagus.

Natesh BG, Caton N, Kim D, Shetty A - Case Rep Otolaryngol (2013)

Gastroscopy showing dilated and tortuous oesophagus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860127&req=5

fig2: Gastroscopy showing dilated and tortuous oesophagus.
Mentions: Flexible oesophogastroduodenoscopy was performed the following day to examine the lower oesophagus. This revealed a grossly dilated and tortuous oesophagus (Figure 2) without the presence of an oesophageal stricture. Barium swallow was also performed and demonstrated a uniformly dilated, atonic oesophagus without evidence of achalasia (Figures 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder.We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Alexandra Hospital, Southwick Hill Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO6 3LY, UK.

ABSTRACT
We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder. We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus