Limits...
Idiopathic oesophageal dysmotility disorder: stridor secondary to megaesophagus.

Natesh BG, Caton N, Kim D, Shetty A - Case Rep Otolaryngol (2013)

Bottom Line: We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder.We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Alexandra Hospital, Southwick Hill Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO6 3LY, UK.

ABSTRACT
We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder. We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chest radiograph showing large air shadow in the neck.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860127&req=5

fig1: Chest radiograph showing large air shadow in the neck.

Mentions: On examination in the emergency department, she had a diffuse, firm anterior neck swelling that was nontender. There was obvious distension of the neck and upper anterior chest veins suggesting the possibility of a superior vena cava obstruction as a result of the neck swelling. The patient was in extreme distress with an impending airway obstruction. A chest radiograph (Figure 1) was performed in the emergency department and demonstrated an unusual large air- filled swelling in the neck. It was evident that the patient was tiring and struggling to maintain adequate oxygenation on maximal oxygen therapy. The patient was therefore directly transferred to theatre for further assessment and definitive airway management. In theatre, with attendance of the anaesthetic and ENT teams, a flexible nasoendoscopic examination demonstrated a smooth and diffuse, noninflamed swelling of the posterior pharyngeal wall which was causing an acute airway obstruction. Vocal cord movements were normal but there was severe oedema of the supraglottic tissues, which further compromised the airway.


Idiopathic oesophageal dysmotility disorder: stridor secondary to megaesophagus.

Natesh BG, Caton N, Kim D, Shetty A - Case Rep Otolaryngol (2013)

Chest radiograph showing large air shadow in the neck.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860127&req=5

fig1: Chest radiograph showing large air shadow in the neck.
Mentions: On examination in the emergency department, she had a diffuse, firm anterior neck swelling that was nontender. There was obvious distension of the neck and upper anterior chest veins suggesting the possibility of a superior vena cava obstruction as a result of the neck swelling. The patient was in extreme distress with an impending airway obstruction. A chest radiograph (Figure 1) was performed in the emergency department and demonstrated an unusual large air- filled swelling in the neck. It was evident that the patient was tiring and struggling to maintain adequate oxygenation on maximal oxygen therapy. The patient was therefore directly transferred to theatre for further assessment and definitive airway management. In theatre, with attendance of the anaesthetic and ENT teams, a flexible nasoendoscopic examination demonstrated a smooth and diffuse, noninflamed swelling of the posterior pharyngeal wall which was causing an acute airway obstruction. Vocal cord movements were normal but there was severe oedema of the supraglottic tissues, which further compromised the airway.

Bottom Line: We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder.We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Alexandra Hospital, Southwick Hill Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO6 3LY, UK.

ABSTRACT
We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder. We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus