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Effect of Kinesiology Taping on breast cancer-related lymphedema: a randomized single-blind controlled pilot study.

Smykla A, Walewicz K, Trybulski R, Halski T, Kucharzewski M, Kucio C, Mikusek W, Klakla K, Taradaj J - Biomed Res Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Comparing the changes in K-tapes with quasi K-tapes changes, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05).The edema reduction of multilayered bandages was much better than in results observed in taping groups.The KT appeared to be ineffective at secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy Basics, Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, Mikolowska 72 Street, 40-065 Katowice, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of Kinesiology Taping (KT) for treating breast cancer-related lymphedema. Sixty-five women with unilateral stage II and III lymphedema were randomly grouped into the KT group (K-tapes, n = 20), the Quasi KT group (quasi K-tapes, n = 22), or the MCT group (multilayered compression therapy group, n = 23). Skin care, 45 min pneumatic compression therapy, 1 h manual lymphatic drainage, and application of K-tape/Quasi K-tapes/multilayered short-stretch bandages were given every treatment session, 3 times per week for 1 month. Patient evaluation items included limb size and percentage edema. Comparing the changes in K-tapes with quasi K-tapes changes, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05). The edema reduction of multilayered bandages was much better than in results observed in taping groups. The KT appeared to be ineffective at secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. The single-blind, controlled pilot study results suggest that K-tape could not replace the bandage, and at this moment it must not be an alternative choice for the breast cancer-related lymphedema patient. The trial is registered with ACTRN12613001173785.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

K-tapes technique.
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fig4: K-tapes technique.

Mentions: Subjects from all groups received a routine treatment, including skin care, 45 min pneumatic compression therapy in use of the DL1200 device (at pressure 90 mmHg, 12 chambers arm overlapping cuff, hold time 3 seconds with no interval), 1 h manual lymphatic drainage, and application of multilayered short-stretch bandages (50–60 mmHg). The tape groups (KT and Quasi KT groups also received standard therapy, but K-tapes were used instead of bandages). Each of the groups was treated 3 times weekly (bandages or K-tapes were applied and changed on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) for in the 4-week intervention period. One physical therapist (PT) provided treatment. The program was standardized, following the same protocol for lymphatic drainage to the anterior trunk, posterior trunk, and affected arm, always mowing fluid from the affected side toward the unimpaired side, after lymphatic drainage and before either the short-stretch bandages (Figure 2) or the Kinesiology Taping application (Figure 3). Both bandages and K-tapes (Figure 4) were applied by the by the physical therapist.


Effect of Kinesiology Taping on breast cancer-related lymphedema: a randomized single-blind controlled pilot study.

Smykla A, Walewicz K, Trybulski R, Halski T, Kucharzewski M, Kucio C, Mikusek W, Klakla K, Taradaj J - Biomed Res Int (2013)

K-tapes technique.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860093&req=5

fig4: K-tapes technique.
Mentions: Subjects from all groups received a routine treatment, including skin care, 45 min pneumatic compression therapy in use of the DL1200 device (at pressure 90 mmHg, 12 chambers arm overlapping cuff, hold time 3 seconds with no interval), 1 h manual lymphatic drainage, and application of multilayered short-stretch bandages (50–60 mmHg). The tape groups (KT and Quasi KT groups also received standard therapy, but K-tapes were used instead of bandages). Each of the groups was treated 3 times weekly (bandages or K-tapes were applied and changed on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) for in the 4-week intervention period. One physical therapist (PT) provided treatment. The program was standardized, following the same protocol for lymphatic drainage to the anterior trunk, posterior trunk, and affected arm, always mowing fluid from the affected side toward the unimpaired side, after lymphatic drainage and before either the short-stretch bandages (Figure 2) or the Kinesiology Taping application (Figure 3). Both bandages and K-tapes (Figure 4) were applied by the by the physical therapist.

Bottom Line: Comparing the changes in K-tapes with quasi K-tapes changes, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05).The edema reduction of multilayered bandages was much better than in results observed in taping groups.The KT appeared to be ineffective at secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy Basics, Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, Mikolowska 72 Street, 40-065 Katowice, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of Kinesiology Taping (KT) for treating breast cancer-related lymphedema. Sixty-five women with unilateral stage II and III lymphedema were randomly grouped into the KT group (K-tapes, n = 20), the Quasi KT group (quasi K-tapes, n = 22), or the MCT group (multilayered compression therapy group, n = 23). Skin care, 45 min pneumatic compression therapy, 1 h manual lymphatic drainage, and application of K-tape/Quasi K-tapes/multilayered short-stretch bandages were given every treatment session, 3 times per week for 1 month. Patient evaluation items included limb size and percentage edema. Comparing the changes in K-tapes with quasi K-tapes changes, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05). The edema reduction of multilayered bandages was much better than in results observed in taping groups. The KT appeared to be ineffective at secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. The single-blind, controlled pilot study results suggest that K-tape could not replace the bandage, and at this moment it must not be an alternative choice for the breast cancer-related lymphedema patient. The trial is registered with ACTRN12613001173785.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus