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The study on biocompatibility of porous nHA/PLGA composite scaffolds for tissue engineering with rabbit chondrocytes in vitro.

Chen L, Zhu WM, Fei ZQ, Chen JL, Xiong JY, Zhang JF, Duan L, Huang J, Liu Z, Wang D, Zeng Y - Biomed Res Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Cells on the surface and in the pores of the scaffold increased in a time-dependent manner.Results obtained from flow cytometry showed that there was no significant difference in cell cycle profiles between the coculture group and control (P > 0.05).The porous nHA/PLGA composite scaffold is a biocompatible and good kind of scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510182, China ; Department of Orthopedics, Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen, Sungang West Road, Futian District, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518035, China ; Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518035, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the biocompatibility of a novel nanohydroxyapatite/poly[lactic-co-glycolic acid] (nHA/PLGA) composite and evaluate its feasibility as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

Methods: Chondrocytes of fetal rabbit were cultured with nHA/PLGA scaffold in vitro and the cell viability was assessed by MTT assay first. Cells adhering to nHA/PLGA scaffold were then observed by inverted microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The cell cycle profile was analyzed by flow cytometry.

Results: The viability of the chondrocytes on the scaffold was not affected by nHA/PLGA comparing with the control group as it was shown by MTT assay. Cells on the surface and in the pores of the scaffold increased in a time-dependent manner. Results obtained from flow cytometry showed that there was no significant difference in cell cycle profiles between the coculture group and control (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: The porous nHA/PLGA composite scaffold is a biocompatible and good kind of scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

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SEM images of the cocultured porous PLGA/n-HA composites with chondrocytes. (a) The chondrocytes were seeded on the composite and after 1 day in culture, cells were observed to adhere to the composite (1000x). (b) Cell processes were seen extending from the pores after 3 days in coculture (2000x). (c) Cells adhering to the composite increased after 3 days in coculture and connected with each other by processes (5000x). (d) The surfaces of the composite were fully covered by cells after 5 days in co-culture (1000x).
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fig5: SEM images of the cocultured porous PLGA/n-HA composites with chondrocytes. (a) The chondrocytes were seeded on the composite and after 1 day in culture, cells were observed to adhere to the composite (1000x). (b) Cell processes were seen extending from the pores after 3 days in coculture (2000x). (c) Cells adhering to the composite increased after 3 days in coculture and connected with each other by processes (5000x). (d) The surfaces of the composite were fully covered by cells after 5 days in co-culture (1000x).

Mentions: The images of chondrocytes grown on the scaffold were shown in Figure 5. Chondrocytes on the scaffold showed good extension capability and were fusiform-shaped. The cells increased in a time-dependent manner and gradually fused.


The study on biocompatibility of porous nHA/PLGA composite scaffolds for tissue engineering with rabbit chondrocytes in vitro.

Chen L, Zhu WM, Fei ZQ, Chen JL, Xiong JY, Zhang JF, Duan L, Huang J, Liu Z, Wang D, Zeng Y - Biomed Res Int (2013)

SEM images of the cocultured porous PLGA/n-HA composites with chondrocytes. (a) The chondrocytes were seeded on the composite and after 1 day in culture, cells were observed to adhere to the composite (1000x). (b) Cell processes were seen extending from the pores after 3 days in coculture (2000x). (c) Cells adhering to the composite increased after 3 days in coculture and connected with each other by processes (5000x). (d) The surfaces of the composite were fully covered by cells after 5 days in co-culture (1000x).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860085&req=5

fig5: SEM images of the cocultured porous PLGA/n-HA composites with chondrocytes. (a) The chondrocytes were seeded on the composite and after 1 day in culture, cells were observed to adhere to the composite (1000x). (b) Cell processes were seen extending from the pores after 3 days in coculture (2000x). (c) Cells adhering to the composite increased after 3 days in coculture and connected with each other by processes (5000x). (d) The surfaces of the composite were fully covered by cells after 5 days in co-culture (1000x).
Mentions: The images of chondrocytes grown on the scaffold were shown in Figure 5. Chondrocytes on the scaffold showed good extension capability and were fusiform-shaped. The cells increased in a time-dependent manner and gradually fused.

Bottom Line: Cells on the surface and in the pores of the scaffold increased in a time-dependent manner.Results obtained from flow cytometry showed that there was no significant difference in cell cycle profiles between the coculture group and control (P > 0.05).The porous nHA/PLGA composite scaffold is a biocompatible and good kind of scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510182, China ; Department of Orthopedics, Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen, Sungang West Road, Futian District, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518035, China ; Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518035, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the biocompatibility of a novel nanohydroxyapatite/poly[lactic-co-glycolic acid] (nHA/PLGA) composite and evaluate its feasibility as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

Methods: Chondrocytes of fetal rabbit were cultured with nHA/PLGA scaffold in vitro and the cell viability was assessed by MTT assay first. Cells adhering to nHA/PLGA scaffold were then observed by inverted microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The cell cycle profile was analyzed by flow cytometry.

Results: The viability of the chondrocytes on the scaffold was not affected by nHA/PLGA comparing with the control group as it was shown by MTT assay. Cells on the surface and in the pores of the scaffold increased in a time-dependent manner. Results obtained from flow cytometry showed that there was no significant difference in cell cycle profiles between the coculture group and control (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: The porous nHA/PLGA composite scaffold is a biocompatible and good kind of scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

Show MeSH