Limits...
Mixed large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma with squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum: Report of a rare case and review of the literature.

Vardas K, Papadimitriou G, Chantziara M, Papakonstantinou A, Drakopoulos S - Int J Surg Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: The patient refused to receive adjuvant chemotherapy and died 6 months later due to liver failure as a result of multiple hepatic metastases.The median survival ranges from 5 to 10.4 months in several studies and there are not sufficient data in bibliography about ideal adjuvant therapy after resection of mixed squamous large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the rectum.More studies should be done in order to determine the ideal adjuvant treatment of these rare and aggressive tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Department of Surgery and Transplant Unit, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: costas_vardas@yahoo.gr.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showing enlarged mesorectal lymph nodes (red arrow). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of the article.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860050&req=5

fig0010: Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showing enlarged mesorectal lymph nodes (red arrow). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of the article.)

Mentions: Colonoscopy was performed, which revealed an ulcerative mass of 6 cm in length (Fig. 1), with its lower margin located 8 cm from the anal verge. Microscopic analysis of biopsy specimens showed morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (chromogranin A+, Synaptophysin A+). The proliferation marker Ki-67 was diffusely stained and was approximately 80%. Cytokeratines C5/6 were negatives. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed pathological enlarged mesorectal lymph nodes (Fig. 2) without obvious liver metastases, while chest CT scan was normal.


Mixed large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma with squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum: Report of a rare case and review of the literature.

Vardas K, Papadimitriou G, Chantziara M, Papakonstantinou A, Drakopoulos S - Int J Surg Case Rep (2013)

Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showing enlarged mesorectal lymph nodes (red arrow). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of the article.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860050&req=5

fig0010: Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showing enlarged mesorectal lymph nodes (red arrow). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of the article.)
Mentions: Colonoscopy was performed, which revealed an ulcerative mass of 6 cm in length (Fig. 1), with its lower margin located 8 cm from the anal verge. Microscopic analysis of biopsy specimens showed morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (chromogranin A+, Synaptophysin A+). The proliferation marker Ki-67 was diffusely stained and was approximately 80%. Cytokeratines C5/6 were negatives. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed pathological enlarged mesorectal lymph nodes (Fig. 2) without obvious liver metastases, while chest CT scan was normal.

Bottom Line: The patient refused to receive adjuvant chemotherapy and died 6 months later due to liver failure as a result of multiple hepatic metastases.The median survival ranges from 5 to 10.4 months in several studies and there are not sufficient data in bibliography about ideal adjuvant therapy after resection of mixed squamous large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the rectum.More studies should be done in order to determine the ideal adjuvant treatment of these rare and aggressive tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Department of Surgery and Transplant Unit, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: costas_vardas@yahoo.gr.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus