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Right salpingo-ovarian and distal ileal entrapment within a paracaecal hernia presenting as acute appendicits.

Dhillon A, Farid SG, Dixon S, Evans J - Int J Surg Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Clinical examination confirmed localised peritonism in the right iliac fossa.At laparoscopy a macroscopically normal appendix and caecum was found.A right salpingectomy as performed and subsequent histopathological examination confirmed infarction of the fallopian tube.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Northampton General Hospital, United Kingdom. Electronic address: ajitdhillon@doctors.org.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Laparoscopic view. The figure shows distal ileum passing through the paracaecal defect () with the caecum displaced anteriorly.
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fig0015: Laparoscopic view. The figure shows distal ileum passing through the paracaecal defect () with the caecum displaced anteriorly.

Mentions: Further ongoing pain on the second day of hospital admission mandated operative intervention. At laparoscopy a macroscopically normal appendix and caecum were found, in addition to a smooth non-indentable mass in the lateral right iliac fossa. Loops of distal ileum were observed to pass through a retrocaecal mesenteric defect consistent with a paracaecal hernia and further evaluation revealed entrapment of the right ovary and fallopian tube (Fig. 3). The fallopian tube appeared ischaemic and after evaluation by gynaecology colleagues was considered to be non-viable and a salpingectomy was performed. The ileum and ovary were not compromised. To prevent future recurrence of internal hernias in this area the entire paracolic attachment was divided. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient discharged on day 4. At 2 months review she remained clinically well and pain free. Subsequent histopathological examination confirmed infarction of the fallopian tube.


Right salpingo-ovarian and distal ileal entrapment within a paracaecal hernia presenting as acute appendicits.

Dhillon A, Farid SG, Dixon S, Evans J - Int J Surg Case Rep (2013)

Laparoscopic view. The figure shows distal ileum passing through the paracaecal defect () with the caecum displaced anteriorly.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860031&req=5

fig0015: Laparoscopic view. The figure shows distal ileum passing through the paracaecal defect () with the caecum displaced anteriorly.
Mentions: Further ongoing pain on the second day of hospital admission mandated operative intervention. At laparoscopy a macroscopically normal appendix and caecum were found, in addition to a smooth non-indentable mass in the lateral right iliac fossa. Loops of distal ileum were observed to pass through a retrocaecal mesenteric defect consistent with a paracaecal hernia and further evaluation revealed entrapment of the right ovary and fallopian tube (Fig. 3). The fallopian tube appeared ischaemic and after evaluation by gynaecology colleagues was considered to be non-viable and a salpingectomy was performed. The ileum and ovary were not compromised. To prevent future recurrence of internal hernias in this area the entire paracolic attachment was divided. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient discharged on day 4. At 2 months review she remained clinically well and pain free. Subsequent histopathological examination confirmed infarction of the fallopian tube.

Bottom Line: Clinical examination confirmed localised peritonism in the right iliac fossa.At laparoscopy a macroscopically normal appendix and caecum was found.A right salpingectomy as performed and subsequent histopathological examination confirmed infarction of the fallopian tube.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Northampton General Hospital, United Kingdom. Electronic address: ajitdhillon@doctors.org.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus