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Duodenal fistula associated with a peri-appendiceal abscess: A case report.

Okumura K, Suganuma T, Nakatani K, Okada S, Kubota T, Lefor AT - Int J Surg Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: He was then treated with piperacillin and tazobactam after undergoing ultrasound-guided drainage, after which his overall condition improved.Pathological examination showed granulomatous tissue inside the appendix with an inflammatory background and fecaliths infiltrated by macrophages.The possibility of fistula formation should be considered in patients with complicated appendicitis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Tokyo Bay Urayasu-Ichikawa Medical Center (Noguchi Memorial Institution Hospital), Urayasu, Japan; Department of Surgery, Uwamachi General Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan. Electronic address: kenjiokumura@kyudai.jp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Abdominal computed tomography showed a 7 cm × 5 cm × 8 cm retroperitoneal abscess with high density lesions and compression of adjacent organs including the duodenum and ascending colon.
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fig0005: Abdominal computed tomography showed a 7 cm × 5 cm × 8 cm retroperitoneal abscess with high density lesions and compression of adjacent organs including the duodenum and ascending colon.

Mentions: A 53-year-old Japanese man presented with a 10-day history of lower abdominal pain. He reported no diarrhea, weight loss or back pain. He had a past medical history of hypertension and iron deficiency anemia, and his only medication was for iron deficiency anemia. His weight was 81.3 kg and BMI 28.3 kg/m2. The remainder of the physical examination revealed a fever of 38.3 °C and right lower abdominal tenderness on palpation. Laboratory data revealed a mild leukocytosis (white blood cell count of 10,400/mm3) and iron deficiency anemia. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a 7 cm × 5 cm × 8 cm retroperitoneal abscess with high-density lesions and compression of adjacent organs including the duodenum and ascending colon (Fig. 1). This was felt to be consistent with perforated appendicitis, and treatment was begun with intravenous piperacillin and tazobactam. Ultrasound-guided drainage of the abscess was also performed.


Duodenal fistula associated with a peri-appendiceal abscess: A case report.

Okumura K, Suganuma T, Nakatani K, Okada S, Kubota T, Lefor AT - Int J Surg Case Rep (2013)

Abdominal computed tomography showed a 7 cm × 5 cm × 8 cm retroperitoneal abscess with high density lesions and compression of adjacent organs including the duodenum and ascending colon.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3860027&req=5

fig0005: Abdominal computed tomography showed a 7 cm × 5 cm × 8 cm retroperitoneal abscess with high density lesions and compression of adjacent organs including the duodenum and ascending colon.
Mentions: A 53-year-old Japanese man presented with a 10-day history of lower abdominal pain. He reported no diarrhea, weight loss or back pain. He had a past medical history of hypertension and iron deficiency anemia, and his only medication was for iron deficiency anemia. His weight was 81.3 kg and BMI 28.3 kg/m2. The remainder of the physical examination revealed a fever of 38.3 °C and right lower abdominal tenderness on palpation. Laboratory data revealed a mild leukocytosis (white blood cell count of 10,400/mm3) and iron deficiency anemia. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a 7 cm × 5 cm × 8 cm retroperitoneal abscess with high-density lesions and compression of adjacent organs including the duodenum and ascending colon (Fig. 1). This was felt to be consistent with perforated appendicitis, and treatment was begun with intravenous piperacillin and tazobactam. Ultrasound-guided drainage of the abscess was also performed.

Bottom Line: He was then treated with piperacillin and tazobactam after undergoing ultrasound-guided drainage, after which his overall condition improved.Pathological examination showed granulomatous tissue inside the appendix with an inflammatory background and fecaliths infiltrated by macrophages.The possibility of fistula formation should be considered in patients with complicated appendicitis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Tokyo Bay Urayasu-Ichikawa Medical Center (Noguchi Memorial Institution Hospital), Urayasu, Japan; Department of Surgery, Uwamachi General Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan. Electronic address: kenjiokumura@kyudai.jp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus