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Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in an urban poultry flock.

Crespo R, Garner MM, Hopkins SG, Shah DH - BMC Vet. Res. (2013)

Bottom Line: Gram-positive organisms were seen in histologic sections of the heart and spleen.Listeria monocytogenes was detected by real time PCR from formalin fixed heart and spleen, and was isolated from fresh lung, spleen, and liver.This isolate was identified as L. monocytogenes serotype 4b by 16S rDNA sequencing and by PCR-based serotyping assay.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Avian Health and Food Safety Laboratory, Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Washington State University, 2607 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA 98371, USA. crespor@wsu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Listeria monocytogenes infection is most commonly recognized in ruminants, including cattle, sheep, and goats; but it is rarely diagnosed in poultry. This report describes an outbreak of L. monocytogenes in a backyard poultry flock. Also, it points out the importance of collaboration between veterinarians and public health departments and the possible implications of zoonotic diseases.

Case presentation: Depression, lack of appetite, labored breathing, and increased mortality were noted for 5 months in several affected birds within the flock. The pathologic changes in the internal organs of infected birds included severe myocarditis, pericarditis, pneumonia, hepatitis, and splenitis. No lesions were noted in the brain. Gram-positive organisms were seen in histologic sections of the heart and spleen. Listeria monocytogenes was detected by real time PCR from formalin fixed heart and spleen, and was isolated from fresh lung, spleen, and liver. This isolate was identified as L. monocytogenes serotype 4b by 16S rDNA sequencing and by PCR-based serotyping assay.

Conclusions: This is the first report describing outbreak of L. monocytogenes in backyard poultry flock in Washington State and use of molecular methods to confirm L. monocytogenes infection from formalin fixed tissues.

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Gram positive bacteria in the heart. Histologic section of the heart showing inflammation and presence of Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria (arrows) between the myofibers. Modified Brown-Hopps gram stain. Bar = 10 μm.
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Figure 3: Gram positive bacteria in the heart. Histologic section of the heart showing inflammation and presence of Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria (arrows) between the myofibers. Modified Brown-Hopps gram stain. Bar = 10 μm.

Mentions: Histologic findings were similar in the two birds submitted separately. The most prominent lesion was extensive inflammation of the heart (Figure 1), consisted of lymphocytes, macrophages, numerous multinucleated giant cells, and occasional heterophils. The lumen of larger blood vessels contained numerous large lymphocytes and scattered heterophils. In the liver there were random, small necrotic foci and accumulation of heterophils and macrophages (Figure 2). Lung sections revealed interstitial pneumonia, with infiltration of heterophils in the air capillaries and edema accumulating in the interparabronchial spaces. Lesions in the pancreas consisted of mild lymphocytic inflammation around the ducts. Spleen sections revealed severe lymphoid depletion, random accumulation of fibrin in the white pulp, and several macrophages contained intracytoplasmic cellular debris. Rod-shaped, Gram-positive bacteria were noted in the heart (Figure 3) and spleen.


Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in an urban poultry flock.

Crespo R, Garner MM, Hopkins SG, Shah DH - BMC Vet. Res. (2013)

Gram positive bacteria in the heart. Histologic section of the heart showing inflammation and presence of Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria (arrows) between the myofibers. Modified Brown-Hopps gram stain. Bar = 10 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852838&req=5

Figure 3: Gram positive bacteria in the heart. Histologic section of the heart showing inflammation and presence of Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria (arrows) between the myofibers. Modified Brown-Hopps gram stain. Bar = 10 μm.
Mentions: Histologic findings were similar in the two birds submitted separately. The most prominent lesion was extensive inflammation of the heart (Figure 1), consisted of lymphocytes, macrophages, numerous multinucleated giant cells, and occasional heterophils. The lumen of larger blood vessels contained numerous large lymphocytes and scattered heterophils. In the liver there were random, small necrotic foci and accumulation of heterophils and macrophages (Figure 2). Lung sections revealed interstitial pneumonia, with infiltration of heterophils in the air capillaries and edema accumulating in the interparabronchial spaces. Lesions in the pancreas consisted of mild lymphocytic inflammation around the ducts. Spleen sections revealed severe lymphoid depletion, random accumulation of fibrin in the white pulp, and several macrophages contained intracytoplasmic cellular debris. Rod-shaped, Gram-positive bacteria were noted in the heart (Figure 3) and spleen.

Bottom Line: Gram-positive organisms were seen in histologic sections of the heart and spleen.Listeria monocytogenes was detected by real time PCR from formalin fixed heart and spleen, and was isolated from fresh lung, spleen, and liver.This isolate was identified as L. monocytogenes serotype 4b by 16S rDNA sequencing and by PCR-based serotyping assay.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Avian Health and Food Safety Laboratory, Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Washington State University, 2607 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA 98371, USA. crespor@wsu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Listeria monocytogenes infection is most commonly recognized in ruminants, including cattle, sheep, and goats; but it is rarely diagnosed in poultry. This report describes an outbreak of L. monocytogenes in a backyard poultry flock. Also, it points out the importance of collaboration between veterinarians and public health departments and the possible implications of zoonotic diseases.

Case presentation: Depression, lack of appetite, labored breathing, and increased mortality were noted for 5 months in several affected birds within the flock. The pathologic changes in the internal organs of infected birds included severe myocarditis, pericarditis, pneumonia, hepatitis, and splenitis. No lesions were noted in the brain. Gram-positive organisms were seen in histologic sections of the heart and spleen. Listeria monocytogenes was detected by real time PCR from formalin fixed heart and spleen, and was isolated from fresh lung, spleen, and liver. This isolate was identified as L. monocytogenes serotype 4b by 16S rDNA sequencing and by PCR-based serotyping assay.

Conclusions: This is the first report describing outbreak of L. monocytogenes in backyard poultry flock in Washington State and use of molecular methods to confirm L. monocytogenes infection from formalin fixed tissues.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus