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"This bicycle gives me a headache", a congenital anomaly.

Versteegh HP, Feitz WF, van Lindert EJ, Marcelis C, de Blaauw I - BMC Res Notes (2013)

Bottom Line: However, it can also result in less common complaints and symptoms.Finally, she solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle.On physical examination no abnormalities were found except the ileostomy that was present ever since soon after birth and her urinary incontinence.Three months after successful surgery she had no complaints and was able to ride a bike again.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery-Pediatric Surgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. ivo.deBlaauw@radboudumc.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: [corrected] The combination of a presacral mass, a sacral bone deformity, and an anorectal malformation are also known as the Currarino triad or Currarino syndrome. The syndrome is associated with a very high rate of severe and intractable constipation and urinary incontinence. However, it can also result in less common complaints and symptoms. Although the syndrome is known since 1981 and the involved genes are clarified to a great extent, the diagnosis may be delayed or missed if unrecognized.

Case presentation: A 24-year old female presented with periodical headaches. She was born with an imperforate anus, absent rectum and colon, double bladder, and sacral defect. Soon after birth she underwent several surgical procedures for anorectal and bladder reconstructions. The patient now came to her pediatric urologist for urinary incontinence and mentioned severe headaches on the side, particularly when riding a bike. Finally, she solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle.On physical examination no abnormalities were found except the ileostomy that was present ever since soon after birth and her urinary incontinence. Blood tests showed no abnormalities. Additional MRI showed a large and previously not known anterior meningocele at the level of the sacrum. Surgical treatment consisted of closure of the dura by posterior approach.

Conclusion: In this case report we describe the late discovery with an atypical presentation of an anterior meningocele in a young adult with urinary incontinence, a sacral defect, an anorectal malformation and headaches during bicycle riding. After surgical treatment of our patient the meningocele regressed. Three months after successful surgery she had no complaints and was able to ride a bike again.

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The MRI of our patient showed a double bladder with urinary output of both kidneys to the bladders.
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Figure 1: The MRI of our patient showed a double bladder with urinary output of both kidneys to the bladders.

Mentions: A 24-year old female presented with urinary incontinence and periodical headaches. She was born with an imperforate anus, absent rectum and colon, double bladder (Figure 1), and a dysgenetic sacrum defect (Figure 2). Soon after birth she was given an ileostomy, and later underwent an anorectal and bladder reconstructions. She now came to her pediatric urologist for urinary incontinence and mentioned severe headaches on the side, particularly when riding a bike. She solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle. Her parents then sold the bicycle since it became useless.


"This bicycle gives me a headache", a congenital anomaly.

Versteegh HP, Feitz WF, van Lindert EJ, Marcelis C, de Blaauw I - BMC Res Notes (2013)

The MRI of our patient showed a double bladder with urinary output of both kidneys to the bladders.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852820&req=5

Figure 1: The MRI of our patient showed a double bladder with urinary output of both kidneys to the bladders.
Mentions: A 24-year old female presented with urinary incontinence and periodical headaches. She was born with an imperforate anus, absent rectum and colon, double bladder (Figure 1), and a dysgenetic sacrum defect (Figure 2). Soon after birth she was given an ileostomy, and later underwent an anorectal and bladder reconstructions. She now came to her pediatric urologist for urinary incontinence and mentioned severe headaches on the side, particularly when riding a bike. She solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle. Her parents then sold the bicycle since it became useless.

Bottom Line: However, it can also result in less common complaints and symptoms.Finally, she solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle.On physical examination no abnormalities were found except the ileostomy that was present ever since soon after birth and her urinary incontinence.Three months after successful surgery she had no complaints and was able to ride a bike again.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery-Pediatric Surgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. ivo.deBlaauw@radboudumc.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: [corrected] The combination of a presacral mass, a sacral bone deformity, and an anorectal malformation are also known as the Currarino triad or Currarino syndrome. The syndrome is associated with a very high rate of severe and intractable constipation and urinary incontinence. However, it can also result in less common complaints and symptoms. Although the syndrome is known since 1981 and the involved genes are clarified to a great extent, the diagnosis may be delayed or missed if unrecognized.

Case presentation: A 24-year old female presented with periodical headaches. She was born with an imperforate anus, absent rectum and colon, double bladder, and sacral defect. Soon after birth she underwent several surgical procedures for anorectal and bladder reconstructions. The patient now came to her pediatric urologist for urinary incontinence and mentioned severe headaches on the side, particularly when riding a bike. Finally, she solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle.On physical examination no abnormalities were found except the ileostomy that was present ever since soon after birth and her urinary incontinence. Blood tests showed no abnormalities. Additional MRI showed a large and previously not known anterior meningocele at the level of the sacrum. Surgical treatment consisted of closure of the dura by posterior approach.

Conclusion: In this case report we describe the late discovery with an atypical presentation of an anterior meningocele in a young adult with urinary incontinence, a sacral defect, an anorectal malformation and headaches during bicycle riding. After surgical treatment of our patient the meningocele regressed. Three months after successful surgery she had no complaints and was able to ride a bike again.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus