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Increased accumulation of magnetic nanoparticles by magnetizable implant materials for the treatment of implant-associated complications.

Angrisani N, Foth F, Kietzmann M, Schumacher S, Angrisani GL, Christel A, Behrens P, Reifenrath J - J Nanobiotechnology (2013)

Bottom Line: Therewith a significantly higher amount of magnetic nanoparticles could be accumulated in the area of the platelet compared to the sole magnetic field.Albeit not significantly the magnetic field strength tended to increase with thicker platelets.In this way higher drug levels in the target area might be attained resulting in lower inconveniences for the patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, Germany. nina.angrisani@tiho-hannover.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: In orthopaedic surgery, accumulation of agents such as anti-infectives in the bone as target tissue is difficult. The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers principally enables their accumulation via an externally applied magnetic field. Magnetizable implants are principally able to increase the strength of an externally applied magnetic field to reach also deep-seated parts in the body. Therefore, the integration of bone-addressed therapeutics in MNPs and their accumulation at a magnetic orthopaedic implant could improve the treatment of implant related infections. In this study a martensitic steel platelet as implant placeholder was used to examine its accumulation and retention capacity of MNPs in an in vitro experimental set up considering different experimental frame conditions as magnet quantity and distance to each other, implant thickness and flow velocity.

Results: The magnetic field strength increased to approximately 112% when a martensitic stainless steel platelet was located between the magnet poles. Therewith a significantly higher amount of magnetic nanoparticles could be accumulated in the area of the platelet compared to the sole magnetic field. During flushing of the tube system mimicking the in vivo blood flow, the magnetized platelet was able to retain a higher amount of MNPs without an external magnetic field compared to the set up with no mounted platelet during flushing of the system. Generally, a higher flow velocity led to lower amounts of accumulated MNPs. A higher quantity of magnets and a lower distance between magnets led to a higher magnetic field strength. Albeit not significantly the magnetic field strength tended to increase with thicker platelets.

Conclusion: A martensitic steel platelet significantly improved the attachment of magnetic nanoparticles in an in vitro flow system and therewith indicates the potential of magnetic implant materials in orthopaedic surgery. The use of a remanent magnetic implant material could improve the efficiency of capturing MNPs especially when the external magnetic field is turned off thus facilitating and prolonging the effect. In this way higher drug levels in the target area might be attained resulting in lower inconveniences for the patient.

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Magnetic nanoparticles enclosed in a nanoporous silica shell. The inner pore volume of such particles can be used for the future incorporation of drugs; the outer surface can be employed to bind fluorescent molecules for imaging and biomacromolecules for improving biocompatibility.
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Figure 1: Magnetic nanoparticles enclosed in a nanoporous silica shell. The inner pore volume of such particles can be used for the future incorporation of drugs; the outer surface can be employed to bind fluorescent molecules for imaging and biomacromolecules for improving biocompatibility.

Mentions: The aim of the present study was to examine the suitability of a martensitic steel platelet (Type 1.4122) on the ability to accumulate magnetic nanoparticles in an in vitro setup. These particles consist of a magnetic core composed of magnetite (Fe3O4) enclosed by a nanoporous silica layer [16] which serves for the future incorporation of drugs (Figure 1).


Increased accumulation of magnetic nanoparticles by magnetizable implant materials for the treatment of implant-associated complications.

Angrisani N, Foth F, Kietzmann M, Schumacher S, Angrisani GL, Christel A, Behrens P, Reifenrath J - J Nanobiotechnology (2013)

Magnetic nanoparticles enclosed in a nanoporous silica shell. The inner pore volume of such particles can be used for the future incorporation of drugs; the outer surface can be employed to bind fluorescent molecules for imaging and biomacromolecules for improving biocompatibility.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852484&req=5

Figure 1: Magnetic nanoparticles enclosed in a nanoporous silica shell. The inner pore volume of such particles can be used for the future incorporation of drugs; the outer surface can be employed to bind fluorescent molecules for imaging and biomacromolecules for improving biocompatibility.
Mentions: The aim of the present study was to examine the suitability of a martensitic steel platelet (Type 1.4122) on the ability to accumulate magnetic nanoparticles in an in vitro setup. These particles consist of a magnetic core composed of magnetite (Fe3O4) enclosed by a nanoporous silica layer [16] which serves for the future incorporation of drugs (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Therewith a significantly higher amount of magnetic nanoparticles could be accumulated in the area of the platelet compared to the sole magnetic field.Albeit not significantly the magnetic field strength tended to increase with thicker platelets.In this way higher drug levels in the target area might be attained resulting in lower inconveniences for the patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, Germany. nina.angrisani@tiho-hannover.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: In orthopaedic surgery, accumulation of agents such as anti-infectives in the bone as target tissue is difficult. The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers principally enables their accumulation via an externally applied magnetic field. Magnetizable implants are principally able to increase the strength of an externally applied magnetic field to reach also deep-seated parts in the body. Therefore, the integration of bone-addressed therapeutics in MNPs and their accumulation at a magnetic orthopaedic implant could improve the treatment of implant related infections. In this study a martensitic steel platelet as implant placeholder was used to examine its accumulation and retention capacity of MNPs in an in vitro experimental set up considering different experimental frame conditions as magnet quantity and distance to each other, implant thickness and flow velocity.

Results: The magnetic field strength increased to approximately 112% when a martensitic stainless steel platelet was located between the magnet poles. Therewith a significantly higher amount of magnetic nanoparticles could be accumulated in the area of the platelet compared to the sole magnetic field. During flushing of the tube system mimicking the in vivo blood flow, the magnetized platelet was able to retain a higher amount of MNPs without an external magnetic field compared to the set up with no mounted platelet during flushing of the system. Generally, a higher flow velocity led to lower amounts of accumulated MNPs. A higher quantity of magnets and a lower distance between magnets led to a higher magnetic field strength. Albeit not significantly the magnetic field strength tended to increase with thicker platelets.

Conclusion: A martensitic steel platelet significantly improved the attachment of magnetic nanoparticles in an in vitro flow system and therewith indicates the potential of magnetic implant materials in orthopaedic surgery. The use of a remanent magnetic implant material could improve the efficiency of capturing MNPs especially when the external magnetic field is turned off thus facilitating and prolonging the effect. In this way higher drug levels in the target area might be attained resulting in lower inconveniences for the patient.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus