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Students benefit from developing their own emergency medicine OSCE stations: a comparative study using the matched-pair method.

Heinke W, Rotzoll D, Hempel G, Zupanic M, Stumpp P, Kaisers UX, Fischer MR - BMC Med Educ (2013)

Bottom Line: If a similar effect occurred when creating OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) stations by themselves it could be beneficial to involve them in the development of OSCE stations.Cohen's effect size was d = 1.24.Students who actively develop OSCE stations when preparing for an emergency medicine OSCE achieve better exam results.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 20, Leipzig 04103, Germany. wolfgang.heinke@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Students can improve the learning process by developing their own multiple choice questions. If a similar effect occurred when creating OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) stations by themselves it could be beneficial to involve them in the development of OSCE stations. This study investigates the effect of students developing emergency medicine OSCE stations on their test performance.

Method: In the 2011/12 winter semester, an emergency medicine OSCE was held for the first time at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Leipzig. When preparing for the OSCE, 13 students (the intervention group) developed and tested emergency medicine examination stations as a learning experience. Their subsequent OSCE performance was compared to that of 13 other students (the control group), who were parallelized in terms of age, gender, semester and level of previous knowledge using the matched-pair method. In addition, both groups were compared to 20 students who tested the OSCE prior to regular emergency medicine training (test OSCE group).

Results: There were no differences between the three groups regarding age (24.3 ± 2.6; 24.2 ± 3.4 and 24 ± 2.3 years) or previous knowledge (29.3 ± 3.4; 29.3 ± 3.2 and 28.9 ± 4.7 points in the multiple choice [MC] exam in emergency medicine). Merely the gender distribution differed (8 female and 5 male students in the intervention and control group vs. 3 males and 17 females in the test OSCE group).In the exam OSCE, participants in the intervention group scored 233.4 ± 6.3 points (mean ± SD) compared to 223.8 ± 9.2 points (p < 0.01) in the control group. Cohen's effect size was d = 1.24. The students of the test OSCE group scored 223.2 ± 13.4 points.

Conclusions: Students who actively develop OSCE stations when preparing for an emergency medicine OSCE achieve better exam results.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Scores at the individual OSCE stations. Significant differences are marked by an asterisk.
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Figure 1: Scores at the individual OSCE stations. Significant differences are marked by an asterisk.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows a clear trend with the students in the intervention group scoring better than the control group at all stations. Although this effect can be statistically demonstrated for the basic life support (p = 0.043) and venous access (p = 0.037) stations, the differences at the other individual stations were not significant (t-test for paired samples at normal distribution, Mann–Whitney U test with non-normal distribution, p > 0.05).


Students benefit from developing their own emergency medicine OSCE stations: a comparative study using the matched-pair method.

Heinke W, Rotzoll D, Hempel G, Zupanic M, Stumpp P, Kaisers UX, Fischer MR - BMC Med Educ (2013)

Scores at the individual OSCE stations. Significant differences are marked by an asterisk.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852440&req=5

Figure 1: Scores at the individual OSCE stations. Significant differences are marked by an asterisk.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows a clear trend with the students in the intervention group scoring better than the control group at all stations. Although this effect can be statistically demonstrated for the basic life support (p = 0.043) and venous access (p = 0.037) stations, the differences at the other individual stations were not significant (t-test for paired samples at normal distribution, Mann–Whitney U test with non-normal distribution, p > 0.05).

Bottom Line: If a similar effect occurred when creating OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) stations by themselves it could be beneficial to involve them in the development of OSCE stations.Cohen's effect size was d = 1.24.Students who actively develop OSCE stations when preparing for an emergency medicine OSCE achieve better exam results.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 20, Leipzig 04103, Germany. wolfgang.heinke@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Students can improve the learning process by developing their own multiple choice questions. If a similar effect occurred when creating OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) stations by themselves it could be beneficial to involve them in the development of OSCE stations. This study investigates the effect of students developing emergency medicine OSCE stations on their test performance.

Method: In the 2011/12 winter semester, an emergency medicine OSCE was held for the first time at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Leipzig. When preparing for the OSCE, 13 students (the intervention group) developed and tested emergency medicine examination stations as a learning experience. Their subsequent OSCE performance was compared to that of 13 other students (the control group), who were parallelized in terms of age, gender, semester and level of previous knowledge using the matched-pair method. In addition, both groups were compared to 20 students who tested the OSCE prior to regular emergency medicine training (test OSCE group).

Results: There were no differences between the three groups regarding age (24.3 ± 2.6; 24.2 ± 3.4 and 24 ± 2.3 years) or previous knowledge (29.3 ± 3.4; 29.3 ± 3.2 and 28.9 ± 4.7 points in the multiple choice [MC] exam in emergency medicine). Merely the gender distribution differed (8 female and 5 male students in the intervention and control group vs. 3 males and 17 females in the test OSCE group).In the exam OSCE, participants in the intervention group scored 233.4 ± 6.3 points (mean ± SD) compared to 223.8 ± 9.2 points (p < 0.01) in the control group. Cohen's effect size was d = 1.24. The students of the test OSCE group scored 223.2 ± 13.4 points.

Conclusions: Students who actively develop OSCE stations when preparing for an emergency medicine OSCE achieve better exam results.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus