Limits...
Balance ability and postural stability among patients with painful shoulder disorders and healthy controls.

Baierle T, Kromer T, Petermann C, Magosch P, Luomajoki H - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2013)

Bottom Line: Patients with shoulder pain showed significantly worse results in measurements of postural stability right/left (p < 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) as well as balance ability right/left (p = 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls.There were no significant group differences with regard to symmetry index.Neither pain intensity nor BMI influenced the outcome parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ZHAW Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Technikumstrasse 71, Winterthur 8401, Switzerland. luom@zhaw.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: In therapeutic settings, patients with shoulder pain often exhibit deficient coordinative abilities in their trunk and lower extremities. The aim of the study was to investigate 1) if there is a connection between shoulder pain and deficits in balance ability and postural stability, 2) if pain intensity is related to balance ability and postural stability, and 3) if there is a connection between body mass index (BMI) and balance ability and postural stability.

Methods: In this case-control study, patients (n = 40) with pathological shoulder pain (> 4 months) were matched with a healthy controls (n = 40) and were compared with regard to their balance ability and postural stability. Outcome parameters were postural stability, balance ability and symmetry index which were measured using the S3-Check system. In addition, the influence of shoulder pain intensity and BMI on the outcome parameters was analysed.

Results: Patients with shoulder pain showed significantly worse results in measurements of postural stability right/left (p < 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) as well as balance ability right/left (p = 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. There were no significant group differences with regard to symmetry index. However, there was a significant (p < 0.01) symmetry shift towards the affected side within the shoulder pain group. There was no correlation between pain intensity and measurements of balance ability or postural stability. Likewise, no correlation between BMI and deficiencies in balance ability and postural stability was established.

Conclusions: Patients with pathological shoulder pain (> 4 months) have deficiencies in balance ability and postural stability; however the underlying mechanisms for this remain unclear. Neither pain intensity nor BMI influenced the outcome parameters. Patients with shoulder pain shift their weight to the affected side. Further research is needed to determine if balance training can improve rehabilitation results in patients with shoulder pathologies.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of measurements of the stability index of both groups. Note: Comparison of the stability index left/right and front/back of shoulder group and control group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852398&req=5

Figure 3: Comparison of measurements of the stability index of both groups. Note: Comparison of the stability index left/right and front/back of shoulder group and control group.

Mentions: When comparing the control group and the shoulder pain group (Figures 3 and4) regarding all six measured parameters of body stability, the control group generally showed lower, or significantly lower, values than the shoulder pain group (stability index right/left p = 0.01, stability index front/back p < 0.01, sensorimotor index right/left p = 0.01, sensorimotor index front/back p = 0.01, symmetry index right/left p = 0.69 and symmetry index front/back p = 0.96). In the analysis of individual values of the symmetry index right/left of subjects with shoulder pathology, significant results (p < 0.01) were found. Twenty-two subjects (55%) showed a symmetry shift towards the affected side, 16 subjects (40%) showed a shift away from the affected side and 2 (5%) subjects had ideal symmetry index values. These results demonstrate a possible association between shoulder pain and body symmetry disorders.


Balance ability and postural stability among patients with painful shoulder disorders and healthy controls.

Baierle T, Kromer T, Petermann C, Magosch P, Luomajoki H - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2013)

Comparison of measurements of the stability index of both groups. Note: Comparison of the stability index left/right and front/back of shoulder group and control group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852398&req=5

Figure 3: Comparison of measurements of the stability index of both groups. Note: Comparison of the stability index left/right and front/back of shoulder group and control group.
Mentions: When comparing the control group and the shoulder pain group (Figures 3 and4) regarding all six measured parameters of body stability, the control group generally showed lower, or significantly lower, values than the shoulder pain group (stability index right/left p = 0.01, stability index front/back p < 0.01, sensorimotor index right/left p = 0.01, sensorimotor index front/back p = 0.01, symmetry index right/left p = 0.69 and symmetry index front/back p = 0.96). In the analysis of individual values of the symmetry index right/left of subjects with shoulder pathology, significant results (p < 0.01) were found. Twenty-two subjects (55%) showed a symmetry shift towards the affected side, 16 subjects (40%) showed a shift away from the affected side and 2 (5%) subjects had ideal symmetry index values. These results demonstrate a possible association between shoulder pain and body symmetry disorders.

Bottom Line: Patients with shoulder pain showed significantly worse results in measurements of postural stability right/left (p < 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) as well as balance ability right/left (p = 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls.There were no significant group differences with regard to symmetry index.Neither pain intensity nor BMI influenced the outcome parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ZHAW Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Technikumstrasse 71, Winterthur 8401, Switzerland. luom@zhaw.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: In therapeutic settings, patients with shoulder pain often exhibit deficient coordinative abilities in their trunk and lower extremities. The aim of the study was to investigate 1) if there is a connection between shoulder pain and deficits in balance ability and postural stability, 2) if pain intensity is related to balance ability and postural stability, and 3) if there is a connection between body mass index (BMI) and balance ability and postural stability.

Methods: In this case-control study, patients (n = 40) with pathological shoulder pain (> 4 months) were matched with a healthy controls (n = 40) and were compared with regard to their balance ability and postural stability. Outcome parameters were postural stability, balance ability and symmetry index which were measured using the S3-Check system. In addition, the influence of shoulder pain intensity and BMI on the outcome parameters was analysed.

Results: Patients with shoulder pain showed significantly worse results in measurements of postural stability right/left (p < 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) as well as balance ability right/left (p = 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. There were no significant group differences with regard to symmetry index. However, there was a significant (p < 0.01) symmetry shift towards the affected side within the shoulder pain group. There was no correlation between pain intensity and measurements of balance ability or postural stability. Likewise, no correlation between BMI and deficiencies in balance ability and postural stability was established.

Conclusions: Patients with pathological shoulder pain (> 4 months) have deficiencies in balance ability and postural stability; however the underlying mechanisms for this remain unclear. Neither pain intensity nor BMI influenced the outcome parameters. Patients with shoulder pain shift their weight to the affected side. Further research is needed to determine if balance training can improve rehabilitation results in patients with shoulder pathologies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus