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Mated progeny production is a biomarker of aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Pickett CL, Dietrich N, Chen J, Xiong C, Kornfeld K - G3 (Bethesda) (2013)

Bottom Line: These results indicate that progeny production does not accelerate reproductive or somatic aging.The timing of age-related somatic degeneration was similar in these groups, suggesting progeny production does not accelerate somatic aging.These results indicate that some mechanisms or pathways control age-related degeneration of both reproductive and somatic tissues in C. elegans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental, Biology Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.

ABSTRACT
The relationships between reproduction and aging are important for understanding the mechanisms of aging and evaluating evolutionary theories of aging. To investigate the effects of progeny production on reproductive and somatic aging, we conducted longitudinal studies of Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites. For mated wild-type animals that were not sperm limited and survived past the end of the reproductive period, high levels of cross-progeny production were positively correlated with delayed reproductive and somatic aging. In this group of animals, individuals that generated more cross progeny also reproduced and lived longer than individuals that generated fewer cross progeny. These results indicate that progeny production does not accelerate reproductive or somatic aging. This longitudinal study demonstrated that cumulative cross progeny production through day four is an early-stage biomarker that is a positive predictor of longevity. Furthermore, in mated animals, high levels of early cross progeny production were positively correlated with high levels of late cross progeny production, indicating that early progeny production does not accelerate reproductive aging. The relationships between progeny production and aging were further evaluated by comparing self-fertile hermaphrodites that generated relatively few self progeny with mated hermaphrodites that generated many cross progeny. The timing of age-related somatic degeneration was similar in these groups, suggesting progeny production does not accelerate somatic aging. These studies rigorously define relationships between progeny production, reproductive aging, and somatic aging and identify new biomarkers of C. elegans aging. These results indicate that some mechanisms or pathways control age-related degeneration of both reproductive and somatic tissues in C. elegans.

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Increased progeny production in mated animals did not accelerate somatic aging. (A, B) Live progeny production, (C, D) reproductive span, (E, F) coordinated body movement span, (G, H) pharyngeal pumping span, and (I, J) life span were quantified for mated and self-fertile WT hermaphrodites and mated and unmated fog-2(q71) females analyzed using a longitudinal study design. The data in (A), (B), (I), and (J) were reported in Pickett and Kornfeld (2013).
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fig1: Increased progeny production in mated animals did not accelerate somatic aging. (A, B) Live progeny production, (C, D) reproductive span, (E, F) coordinated body movement span, (G, H) pharyngeal pumping span, and (I, J) life span were quantified for mated and self-fertile WT hermaphrodites and mated and unmated fog-2(q71) females analyzed using a longitudinal study design. The data in (A), (B), (I), and (J) were reported in Pickett and Kornfeld (2013).

Mentions: Self-fertile, WT hermaphrodites generated 330 ± 40 self-progeny and displayed a reproductive span of 4.6 ± 0.9 days before reproduction ceased due to sperm depletion (Figure 1, A and C and Table 1B). After mating to WT males, WT hermaphrodites that were not sperm limited and survived past the end of the reproductive period displayed a brood size of 710 ± 180 progeny, a 115% increase (Figure 1A and Table 1B). Reproductive span increased to 8.8 ± 1.8 d, a 91% increase (Figure 1C and Table 1B). To analyze these data, we conducted four different statistical tests: analysis of variance (ANOVA), ANOVA after log transformation (log ANOVA), the Wilcoxon test, and the log-rank test (see Materials and Methods). ANOVA is a parametric test based upon the assumption that the data are sampled from a Gaussian distribution; a log transformation improves the fit of the data to a Gaussian distribution. The Wilcoxon and log-rank tests are nonparametric tests that are not based on an assumption about the distribution of the data. It is informative to analyze these data using several statistical tests because measurements such as brood size may have a different distribution in the population compared to measurements such as aging spans. Progeny production of mated WT animals was significantly greater than progeny production of self-fertile WT animals, and mated reproductive span was significantly longer than self-fertile reproductive span based on all four statistical tests (pANOVA < 0.001, plog ANOVA < 0.001, pWilcoxon < 0.001, plog-rank< 0.001) (Table 1B).


Mated progeny production is a biomarker of aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Pickett CL, Dietrich N, Chen J, Xiong C, Kornfeld K - G3 (Bethesda) (2013)

Increased progeny production in mated animals did not accelerate somatic aging. (A, B) Live progeny production, (C, D) reproductive span, (E, F) coordinated body movement span, (G, H) pharyngeal pumping span, and (I, J) life span were quantified for mated and self-fertile WT hermaphrodites and mated and unmated fog-2(q71) females analyzed using a longitudinal study design. The data in (A), (B), (I), and (J) were reported in Pickett and Kornfeld (2013).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852384&req=5

fig1: Increased progeny production in mated animals did not accelerate somatic aging. (A, B) Live progeny production, (C, D) reproductive span, (E, F) coordinated body movement span, (G, H) pharyngeal pumping span, and (I, J) life span were quantified for mated and self-fertile WT hermaphrodites and mated and unmated fog-2(q71) females analyzed using a longitudinal study design. The data in (A), (B), (I), and (J) were reported in Pickett and Kornfeld (2013).
Mentions: Self-fertile, WT hermaphrodites generated 330 ± 40 self-progeny and displayed a reproductive span of 4.6 ± 0.9 days before reproduction ceased due to sperm depletion (Figure 1, A and C and Table 1B). After mating to WT males, WT hermaphrodites that were not sperm limited and survived past the end of the reproductive period displayed a brood size of 710 ± 180 progeny, a 115% increase (Figure 1A and Table 1B). Reproductive span increased to 8.8 ± 1.8 d, a 91% increase (Figure 1C and Table 1B). To analyze these data, we conducted four different statistical tests: analysis of variance (ANOVA), ANOVA after log transformation (log ANOVA), the Wilcoxon test, and the log-rank test (see Materials and Methods). ANOVA is a parametric test based upon the assumption that the data are sampled from a Gaussian distribution; a log transformation improves the fit of the data to a Gaussian distribution. The Wilcoxon and log-rank tests are nonparametric tests that are not based on an assumption about the distribution of the data. It is informative to analyze these data using several statistical tests because measurements such as brood size may have a different distribution in the population compared to measurements such as aging spans. Progeny production of mated WT animals was significantly greater than progeny production of self-fertile WT animals, and mated reproductive span was significantly longer than self-fertile reproductive span based on all four statistical tests (pANOVA < 0.001, plog ANOVA < 0.001, pWilcoxon < 0.001, plog-rank< 0.001) (Table 1B).

Bottom Line: These results indicate that progeny production does not accelerate reproductive or somatic aging.The timing of age-related somatic degeneration was similar in these groups, suggesting progeny production does not accelerate somatic aging.These results indicate that some mechanisms or pathways control age-related degeneration of both reproductive and somatic tissues in C. elegans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental, Biology Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.

ABSTRACT
The relationships between reproduction and aging are important for understanding the mechanisms of aging and evaluating evolutionary theories of aging. To investigate the effects of progeny production on reproductive and somatic aging, we conducted longitudinal studies of Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites. For mated wild-type animals that were not sperm limited and survived past the end of the reproductive period, high levels of cross-progeny production were positively correlated with delayed reproductive and somatic aging. In this group of animals, individuals that generated more cross progeny also reproduced and lived longer than individuals that generated fewer cross progeny. These results indicate that progeny production does not accelerate reproductive or somatic aging. This longitudinal study demonstrated that cumulative cross progeny production through day four is an early-stage biomarker that is a positive predictor of longevity. Furthermore, in mated animals, high levels of early cross progeny production were positively correlated with high levels of late cross progeny production, indicating that early progeny production does not accelerate reproductive aging. The relationships between progeny production and aging were further evaluated by comparing self-fertile hermaphrodites that generated relatively few self progeny with mated hermaphrodites that generated many cross progeny. The timing of age-related somatic degeneration was similar in these groups, suggesting progeny production does not accelerate somatic aging. These studies rigorously define relationships between progeny production, reproductive aging, and somatic aging and identify new biomarkers of C. elegans aging. These results indicate that some mechanisms or pathways control age-related degeneration of both reproductive and somatic tissues in C. elegans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus