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Effects of neck pain on reaching overhead and reading: a case-control study of long and short neck flexion.

Constand MK, Macdermid JC - BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil (2013)

Bottom Line: Differences between groups were determined by comparing the average flexion angle changes in groups by t-tests.The average angle changes experienced by the two groups during the reading task were more variable, but not significantly different.This has implications for primary and secondary prevention.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, L8S 4 L8, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. constamk@mcmaster.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Reaching overhead and reading are tasks that many individuals encounter daily. The level of difficulty of these tasks increases if an individual has neck pain. This study determined the neck movement patterns during these two tasks by comparing neck flexion of individuals with and without neck pain.

Methods: This case control study used the portable video technology, Dartfish ProSuite 5.5 Video Software, to analyse neck flexion movement patterns. Healthy individuals and individuals with neck pain were videotaped while they completed two tasks: reaching overhead from a standing position and reading from a sitting position. A single position of interest was selected for analysis from both tasks. The degree of neck flexion presented by the participant in this position at the beginning and end of the task was recorded. The angle change between these two time points was calculated for each participant. Differences between groups were determined by comparing the average flexion angle changes in groups by t-tests.

Results: The average angle change experienced by controls and neck pain participants during the overhead reaching tasks were very similar and a significant difference was not observed. The average angle changes experienced by the two groups during the reading task were more variable, but not significantly different. A t-test comparing average neck flexion angle change during dominant arm elevation for controls (m = -5.28˚, sd = 31.14) and neck pain participants (m = 5.07˚, sd = 32.41) revealed a mean between group difference of -10.34˚ (t17 = -0.688, p = 0.5003). The average neck flexion angle change during long neck flexion was not statistically different between controls (m = 10.08˚, sd = 18.89) and neck pain participants (m = 4˚, sd = 18.18); although the mean between group difference was 6.08˚ (t17 = 0.6856, p = 0.5022).

Conclusions: Task performance is highly variable between individuals making it difficult to assess the impact of neck pain on small samples even with detailed motion analysis. Despite this, there was a difference in neck posture during reaching activities between controls and patients with neck pain. Neck pain can therefore influence the movement patterns used during daily activities. This has implications for primary and secondary prevention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Participant during overhead reaching task. This image represents Position A and was taken during the analysis of the neck flexion of the participant reaching overhead.
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Figure 1: Participant during overhead reaching task. This image represents Position A and was taken during the analysis of the neck flexion of the participant reaching overhead.

Mentions: The two groups compared were controls (n = 12) and participants with neck pain (n = 7). Participants were video recorded using the Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS Digital ELPH camera while performing a standardized reaching task where they were required to reaching overhead to place a two pound weight on a shelf from a standing position using their dominant arm [6,7]. The shelf was placed 25 inches above the participant’s naval. This action was repeated for 30 seconds to a metronomic beat set at 30 beats per minute indicating to the participant when to elevate and lower the weight from the shelf. Participant movement during the overhead reach was recorded in the sagittal plane. Short neck flexion was tracked in Position A by consistently tracking and measuring the angle between the chin and the plumb line for 30 seconds (Figure 1).


Effects of neck pain on reaching overhead and reading: a case-control study of long and short neck flexion.

Constand MK, Macdermid JC - BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil (2013)

Participant during overhead reaching task. This image represents Position A and was taken during the analysis of the neck flexion of the participant reaching overhead.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852362&req=5

Figure 1: Participant during overhead reaching task. This image represents Position A and was taken during the analysis of the neck flexion of the participant reaching overhead.
Mentions: The two groups compared were controls (n = 12) and participants with neck pain (n = 7). Participants were video recorded using the Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS Digital ELPH camera while performing a standardized reaching task where they were required to reaching overhead to place a two pound weight on a shelf from a standing position using their dominant arm [6,7]. The shelf was placed 25 inches above the participant’s naval. This action was repeated for 30 seconds to a metronomic beat set at 30 beats per minute indicating to the participant when to elevate and lower the weight from the shelf. Participant movement during the overhead reach was recorded in the sagittal plane. Short neck flexion was tracked in Position A by consistently tracking and measuring the angle between the chin and the plumb line for 30 seconds (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Differences between groups were determined by comparing the average flexion angle changes in groups by t-tests.The average angle changes experienced by the two groups during the reading task were more variable, but not significantly different.This has implications for primary and secondary prevention.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, L8S 4 L8, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. constamk@mcmaster.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Reaching overhead and reading are tasks that many individuals encounter daily. The level of difficulty of these tasks increases if an individual has neck pain. This study determined the neck movement patterns during these two tasks by comparing neck flexion of individuals with and without neck pain.

Methods: This case control study used the portable video technology, Dartfish ProSuite 5.5 Video Software, to analyse neck flexion movement patterns. Healthy individuals and individuals with neck pain were videotaped while they completed two tasks: reaching overhead from a standing position and reading from a sitting position. A single position of interest was selected for analysis from both tasks. The degree of neck flexion presented by the participant in this position at the beginning and end of the task was recorded. The angle change between these two time points was calculated for each participant. Differences between groups were determined by comparing the average flexion angle changes in groups by t-tests.

Results: The average angle change experienced by controls and neck pain participants during the overhead reaching tasks were very similar and a significant difference was not observed. The average angle changes experienced by the two groups during the reading task were more variable, but not significantly different. A t-test comparing average neck flexion angle change during dominant arm elevation for controls (m = -5.28˚, sd = 31.14) and neck pain participants (m = 5.07˚, sd = 32.41) revealed a mean between group difference of -10.34˚ (t17 = -0.688, p = 0.5003). The average neck flexion angle change during long neck flexion was not statistically different between controls (m = 10.08˚, sd = 18.89) and neck pain participants (m = 4˚, sd = 18.18); although the mean between group difference was 6.08˚ (t17 = 0.6856, p = 0.5022).

Conclusions: Task performance is highly variable between individuals making it difficult to assess the impact of neck pain on small samples even with detailed motion analysis. Despite this, there was a difference in neck posture during reaching activities between controls and patients with neck pain. Neck pain can therefore influence the movement patterns used during daily activities. This has implications for primary and secondary prevention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus