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Hyperspectral sensing of disease stress in the Caribbean reef-building coral, Orbicella faveolata - perspectives for the field of coral disease monitoring.

Anderson DA, Armstrong RA, Weil E - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The effectiveness of management plans developed for responding to coral disease outbreaks is limited due to the lack of rapid methods of disease diagnosis.The ability to identify disease-affected tissue before lesions become visible could greatly reduce response times to coral disease outbreaks in monitoring efforts.Finally, spectral signatures associated with the poorly understood Caribbean yellow band disease are presented to guide future research on the role of pigments in the etiology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico.

ABSTRACT
The effectiveness of management plans developed for responding to coral disease outbreaks is limited due to the lack of rapid methods of disease diagnosis. In order to fulfill current management guidelines for responding to coral disease outbreaks, alternative methods that significantly reduce response time must be developed. Hyperspectral sensing has been used by various groups to characterize the spectral signatures unique to asymptomatic and bleached corals. The 2010 combined bleaching and Caribbean yellow band disease outbreak in Puerto Rico provided a unique opportunity to investigate the spectral signatures associated with bleached and Caribbean yellow band-diseased colonies of Orbicella faveolata for the first time. Using derivative and cluster analyses of hyperspectral reflectance data, the present study demonstrates the proof of concept that spectral signatures can be used to differentiate between coral disease states. This method enhanced predominant visual methods of diagnosis by distinguishing between different asymptomatic conditions that are identical in field observations and photographic records. The ability to identify disease-affected tissue before lesions become visible could greatly reduce response times to coral disease outbreaks in monitoring efforts. Finally, spectral signatures associated with the poorly understood Caribbean yellow band disease are presented to guide future research on the role of pigments in the etiology.

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Spectral Indices (A) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the red edge region.Vertical lines denote the inflection point of the red edge position between 640 and 740(Kruskal Wallis Analysis: H = 18.53. p<0.0005). (B) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the blue edge region (SDB). Statistically significant differences in sum of the first derivative between 490 and 530 nm (Kruskal Wallis analysis: H = 20.21, p<0.0005). Different letters in parentheses in both (A) and (B) denote significant differences between colony condition (Mann-Whitney pairwise comparison results, α = 0.05).
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pone-0081478-g004: Spectral Indices (A) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the red edge region.Vertical lines denote the inflection point of the red edge position between 640 and 740(Kruskal Wallis Analysis: H = 18.53. p<0.0005). (B) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the blue edge region (SDB). Statistically significant differences in sum of the first derivative between 490 and 530 nm (Kruskal Wallis analysis: H = 20.21, p<0.0005). Different letters in parentheses in both (A) and (B) denote significant differences between colony condition (Mann-Whitney pairwise comparison results, α = 0.05).

Mentions: The two remote sensing indices that demonstrated the ability to separate colony conditions by first derivatives of %R were the red edge position and SDB. There was a statistically significant effect of colony condition on median red edge position (KW results: H = 18.53, p<0.0005). Pairwise MW comparisons (α = 0.05) demonstrated significant differences in the red edge position for CYBDL at 694 nm and BLE at 689 nm. Conditions CYBDA and ASYM both had the same red edge position at 701 nm (Figure 4a). All colony conditions were separable by the SDB index (Figure 4B) (KW results: H = 20.21, p<0.0005; MW comparisons: α = 0.05).


Hyperspectral sensing of disease stress in the Caribbean reef-building coral, Orbicella faveolata - perspectives for the field of coral disease monitoring.

Anderson DA, Armstrong RA, Weil E - PLoS ONE (2013)

Spectral Indices (A) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the red edge region.Vertical lines denote the inflection point of the red edge position between 640 and 740(Kruskal Wallis Analysis: H = 18.53. p<0.0005). (B) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the blue edge region (SDB). Statistically significant differences in sum of the first derivative between 490 and 530 nm (Kruskal Wallis analysis: H = 20.21, p<0.0005). Different letters in parentheses in both (A) and (B) denote significant differences between colony condition (Mann-Whitney pairwise comparison results, α = 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852271&req=5

pone-0081478-g004: Spectral Indices (A) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the red edge region.Vertical lines denote the inflection point of the red edge position between 640 and 740(Kruskal Wallis Analysis: H = 18.53. p<0.0005). (B) First derivative of percent reflectance (%R) in the blue edge region (SDB). Statistically significant differences in sum of the first derivative between 490 and 530 nm (Kruskal Wallis analysis: H = 20.21, p<0.0005). Different letters in parentheses in both (A) and (B) denote significant differences between colony condition (Mann-Whitney pairwise comparison results, α = 0.05).
Mentions: The two remote sensing indices that demonstrated the ability to separate colony conditions by first derivatives of %R were the red edge position and SDB. There was a statistically significant effect of colony condition on median red edge position (KW results: H = 18.53, p<0.0005). Pairwise MW comparisons (α = 0.05) demonstrated significant differences in the red edge position for CYBDL at 694 nm and BLE at 689 nm. Conditions CYBDA and ASYM both had the same red edge position at 701 nm (Figure 4a). All colony conditions were separable by the SDB index (Figure 4B) (KW results: H = 20.21, p<0.0005; MW comparisons: α = 0.05).

Bottom Line: The effectiveness of management plans developed for responding to coral disease outbreaks is limited due to the lack of rapid methods of disease diagnosis.The ability to identify disease-affected tissue before lesions become visible could greatly reduce response times to coral disease outbreaks in monitoring efforts.Finally, spectral signatures associated with the poorly understood Caribbean yellow band disease are presented to guide future research on the role of pigments in the etiology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico.

ABSTRACT
The effectiveness of management plans developed for responding to coral disease outbreaks is limited due to the lack of rapid methods of disease diagnosis. In order to fulfill current management guidelines for responding to coral disease outbreaks, alternative methods that significantly reduce response time must be developed. Hyperspectral sensing has been used by various groups to characterize the spectral signatures unique to asymptomatic and bleached corals. The 2010 combined bleaching and Caribbean yellow band disease outbreak in Puerto Rico provided a unique opportunity to investigate the spectral signatures associated with bleached and Caribbean yellow band-diseased colonies of Orbicella faveolata for the first time. Using derivative and cluster analyses of hyperspectral reflectance data, the present study demonstrates the proof of concept that spectral signatures can be used to differentiate between coral disease states. This method enhanced predominant visual methods of diagnosis by distinguishing between different asymptomatic conditions that are identical in field observations and photographic records. The ability to identify disease-affected tissue before lesions become visible could greatly reduce response times to coral disease outbreaks in monitoring efforts. Finally, spectral signatures associated with the poorly understood Caribbean yellow band disease are presented to guide future research on the role of pigments in the etiology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus