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Replicability and heterogeneity of awake unrestrained canine FMRI responses.

Berns GS, Brooks A, Spivak M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward.The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study.These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Neuropolicy, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previously, we demonstrated the possibility of fMRI in two awake and unrestrained dogs. Here, we determined the replicability and heterogeneity of these results in an additional 11 dogs for a total of 13 subjects. Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward. The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study. These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs.

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Dog participants.Pearl demonstrates the training device. Kady demonstrates the ear muffs. Caylin is with her chin rest, and Mason is getting his ear muffs wrapped to hold them in place.
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pone-0081698-g001: Dog participants.Pearl demonstrates the training device. Kady demonstrates the ear muffs. Caylin is with her chin rest, and Mason is getting his ear muffs wrapped to hold them in place.

Mentions: With careful subject selection, some dogs can complete the training in as little as a few weeks. More commonly, we have found that 2-3 months of training with supervised practice sessions every other week leads to a high success rate on the first scan session. To date, we have trained 15 dogs, and 13 of 15 (87%) have successfully completed the scan (Table 1 and Fig. 1). Except for the first dog (Callie), whose scanning was accomplished by trial-and-error, ten of the other 12 dogs completed the scan on the first attempt. The remaining dogs became sensitized to the noise and required further desensitization. Both succeeded on the second attempt.


Replicability and heterogeneity of awake unrestrained canine FMRI responses.

Berns GS, Brooks A, Spivak M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Dog participants.Pearl demonstrates the training device. Kady demonstrates the ear muffs. Caylin is with her chin rest, and Mason is getting his ear muffs wrapped to hold them in place.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852264&req=5

pone-0081698-g001: Dog participants.Pearl demonstrates the training device. Kady demonstrates the ear muffs. Caylin is with her chin rest, and Mason is getting his ear muffs wrapped to hold them in place.
Mentions: With careful subject selection, some dogs can complete the training in as little as a few weeks. More commonly, we have found that 2-3 months of training with supervised practice sessions every other week leads to a high success rate on the first scan session. To date, we have trained 15 dogs, and 13 of 15 (87%) have successfully completed the scan (Table 1 and Fig. 1). Except for the first dog (Callie), whose scanning was accomplished by trial-and-error, ten of the other 12 dogs completed the scan on the first attempt. The remaining dogs became sensitized to the noise and required further desensitization. Both succeeded on the second attempt.

Bottom Line: Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward.The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study.These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Neuropolicy, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previously, we demonstrated the possibility of fMRI in two awake and unrestrained dogs. Here, we determined the replicability and heterogeneity of these results in an additional 11 dogs for a total of 13 subjects. Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward. The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study. These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs.

Show MeSH