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Enhanced production of green tide algal biomass through additional carbon supply.

de Paula Silva PH, Paul NA, de Nys R, Mata L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment.All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (-) utilization.This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Marine and Tropical Biology & Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3 (-) affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (-) utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3 (-).

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Biomass productivity in response to CO2 enrichment for C. coelothrix, C. patentiramea and C. linum.Data show mean biomass productivity (±1 SE) for each CO2 level*species (n = 3).
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pone-0081164-g003: Biomass productivity in response to CO2 enrichment for C. coelothrix, C. patentiramea and C. linum.Data show mean biomass productivity (±1 SE) for each CO2 level*species (n = 3).

Mentions: The three algal species had different productivity (growth) responses to CO2 enrichment, with a significant interaction between CO2 supply and the species tested (P<0.001, Table 1). The relative productivity of C. coelothrix and C. linum were significantly enhanced (∼26 and 24%, respectively) when supplied with additional CO2 (Fig. 3) The productivity of C. coelothrix increased from 12.5 to 16.8 g DW m−2 day−1, and C. linum from 9.5 to 12 g DW m−2 day−1 (Fig. 3). The productivity of C. patentiramea (5.2 to 6.2 g DW m−2 day−1) to CO2 enrichment was not significantly different to that of the control (Tukey's HSD, P>0.05).


Enhanced production of green tide algal biomass through additional carbon supply.

de Paula Silva PH, Paul NA, de Nys R, Mata L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Biomass productivity in response to CO2 enrichment for C. coelothrix, C. patentiramea and C. linum.Data show mean biomass productivity (±1 SE) for each CO2 level*species (n = 3).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3852247&req=5

pone-0081164-g003: Biomass productivity in response to CO2 enrichment for C. coelothrix, C. patentiramea and C. linum.Data show mean biomass productivity (±1 SE) for each CO2 level*species (n = 3).
Mentions: The three algal species had different productivity (growth) responses to CO2 enrichment, with a significant interaction between CO2 supply and the species tested (P<0.001, Table 1). The relative productivity of C. coelothrix and C. linum were significantly enhanced (∼26 and 24%, respectively) when supplied with additional CO2 (Fig. 3) The productivity of C. coelothrix increased from 12.5 to 16.8 g DW m−2 day−1, and C. linum from 9.5 to 12 g DW m−2 day−1 (Fig. 3). The productivity of C. patentiramea (5.2 to 6.2 g DW m−2 day−1) to CO2 enrichment was not significantly different to that of the control (Tukey's HSD, P>0.05).

Bottom Line: Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment.All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (-) utilization.This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Marine and Tropical Biology & Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3 (-) affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (-) utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3 (-).

Show MeSH