Limits...
Temporal learning and list-level proportion congruency: conflict adaptation or learning when to respond?

Schmidt JR - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: A non-conflict experiment is then presented in which a list-level effect is observed with a contrast, rather than congruency, manipulation.Analyses of the experimental and simulated data could not, however, provide a clear picture of whether temporal learning was the sole contributor to the list-level proportion congruent effect.These results do, however, demonstrate that caution is warranted when interpreting list-level proportion congruent effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The current report presents a temporal learning account as a potential alternative to the conflict adaptation account of list-level proportion congruent effects in the Stroop paradigm. Specifically, retrieval of information about response times on previous trials influences a participant's preparedness to respond at a similar time on following trials. First, an adaptation of the Parallel Episodic Processing (PEP) model is presented, and a list-level effect is produced with a temporal learning mechanism. Next, linear mixed effect model analyses show that temporal learning biases are present in list-level proportion congruent data. A non-conflict experiment is then presented in which a list-level effect is observed with a contrast, rather than congruency, manipulation. Analyses of the experimental and simulated data could not, however, provide a clear picture of whether temporal learning was the sole contributor to the list-level proportion congruent effect. These results do, however, demonstrate that caution is warranted when interpreting list-level proportion congruent effects.

Show MeSH
An illustration of temporal learning via anticipatory drops in the response threshold.The threshold drops earlier in the mostly congruent condition (top panel), benefiting congruent trials. The threshold drops later in the mostly incongruent condition (bottom panel), benefiting incongruent trials. Vertical tick marks on the normal threshold represent retrieved response times.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842973&req=5

pone-0082320-g001: An illustration of temporal learning via anticipatory drops in the response threshold.The threshold drops earlier in the mostly congruent condition (top panel), benefiting congruent trials. The threshold drops later in the mostly incongruent condition (bottom panel), benefiting incongruent trials. Vertical tick marks on the normal threshold represent retrieved response times.

Mentions: The novel suggestion of the current report is that the list-level PC effect may be produced by participants retrieving stored information about when to respond and using this information to prepare for the moment when they are ready to output a response. For instance, if a memory search reveals that most of the previous trials were responded to quite quickly, then participants will be most prepared to respond during that same (fast) response window [26]. As illustrated in Figure 1, this preparedness leads to a decrease in the response threshold at time periods that closely match a number previous response times. This will mean that it will be easier to output a response at a similar time as previous trials, resulting in rhythmic responding [27].


Temporal learning and list-level proportion congruency: conflict adaptation or learning when to respond?

Schmidt JR - PLoS ONE (2013)

An illustration of temporal learning via anticipatory drops in the response threshold.The threshold drops earlier in the mostly congruent condition (top panel), benefiting congruent trials. The threshold drops later in the mostly incongruent condition (bottom panel), benefiting incongruent trials. Vertical tick marks on the normal threshold represent retrieved response times.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842973&req=5

pone-0082320-g001: An illustration of temporal learning via anticipatory drops in the response threshold.The threshold drops earlier in the mostly congruent condition (top panel), benefiting congruent trials. The threshold drops later in the mostly incongruent condition (bottom panel), benefiting incongruent trials. Vertical tick marks on the normal threshold represent retrieved response times.
Mentions: The novel suggestion of the current report is that the list-level PC effect may be produced by participants retrieving stored information about when to respond and using this information to prepare for the moment when they are ready to output a response. For instance, if a memory search reveals that most of the previous trials were responded to quite quickly, then participants will be most prepared to respond during that same (fast) response window [26]. As illustrated in Figure 1, this preparedness leads to a decrease in the response threshold at time periods that closely match a number previous response times. This will mean that it will be easier to output a response at a similar time as previous trials, resulting in rhythmic responding [27].

Bottom Line: A non-conflict experiment is then presented in which a list-level effect is observed with a contrast, rather than congruency, manipulation.Analyses of the experimental and simulated data could not, however, provide a clear picture of whether temporal learning was the sole contributor to the list-level proportion congruent effect.These results do, however, demonstrate that caution is warranted when interpreting list-level proportion congruent effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The current report presents a temporal learning account as a potential alternative to the conflict adaptation account of list-level proportion congruent effects in the Stroop paradigm. Specifically, retrieval of information about response times on previous trials influences a participant's preparedness to respond at a similar time on following trials. First, an adaptation of the Parallel Episodic Processing (PEP) model is presented, and a list-level effect is produced with a temporal learning mechanism. Next, linear mixed effect model analyses show that temporal learning biases are present in list-level proportion congruent data. A non-conflict experiment is then presented in which a list-level effect is observed with a contrast, rather than congruency, manipulation. Analyses of the experimental and simulated data could not, however, provide a clear picture of whether temporal learning was the sole contributor to the list-level proportion congruent effect. These results do, however, demonstrate that caution is warranted when interpreting list-level proportion congruent effects.

Show MeSH