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Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species.

Smith MS, Fridley JD, Yin J, Bauerle TL - Front Plant Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem.Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index.We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Horticulture, Cornell University Ithaca, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between log(vessel area) as a percentage of the total viewing area vs. hydraulic conductivity (kg s MPa−1 m−2). Solid line represents the line of best fit (log[Ks] = 0.095(log[vessel area %]) + 3.66). Points represent species with available HPFM data.
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Figure 2: Relationship between log(vessel area) as a percentage of the total viewing area vs. hydraulic conductivity (kg s MPa−1 m−2). Solid line represents the line of best fit (log[Ks] = 0.095(log[vessel area %]) + 3.66). Points represent species with available HPFM data.

Mentions: A positive relationship was observed between log-transformed vessel area and log-transformed hydraulic conductivity (P = 0.033, Figure 2). This indicates faster water movement in species with a higher number of vessels per xylem area than those with less vessel area per unit xylem area (Figure 3). There was no correlation between Ks and VI (P = 0.6677, Figure 3). When VI was divided into the individual components of VD and VF to test for a relationship with Ks, no relationship was found for either VD (P = 0.3565) or VF (P = 0.380).


Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species.

Smith MS, Fridley JD, Yin J, Bauerle TL - Front Plant Sci (2013)

Relationship between log(vessel area) as a percentage of the total viewing area vs. hydraulic conductivity (kg s MPa−1 m−2). Solid line represents the line of best fit (log[Ks] = 0.095(log[vessel area %]) + 3.66). Points represent species with available HPFM data.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842846&req=5

Figure 2: Relationship between log(vessel area) as a percentage of the total viewing area vs. hydraulic conductivity (kg s MPa−1 m−2). Solid line represents the line of best fit (log[Ks] = 0.095(log[vessel area %]) + 3.66). Points represent species with available HPFM data.
Mentions: A positive relationship was observed between log-transformed vessel area and log-transformed hydraulic conductivity (P = 0.033, Figure 2). This indicates faster water movement in species with a higher number of vessels per xylem area than those with less vessel area per unit xylem area (Figure 3). There was no correlation between Ks and VI (P = 0.6677, Figure 3). When VI was divided into the individual components of VD and VF to test for a relationship with Ks, no relationship was found for either VD (P = 0.3565) or VF (P = 0.380).

Bottom Line: Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem.Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index.We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Horticulture, Cornell University Ithaca, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus