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Mechanics of post-cam engagement during simulated dynamic activity.

Fitzpatrick CK, Clary CW, Cyr AJ, Maletsky LP, Rullkoetter PJ - J. Orthop. Res. (2013)

Bottom Line: Flexion angle and post-cam velocity at engagement demonstrated considerable ranges among designs (23°-89°, and 0.05-0.22 mm/°, respectively).Post-cam velocity was correlated (r = 0.89) with tibiofemoral condylar design features.Condylar geometry, in addition to post-cam geometry, played a significant role in minimizing engagement velocity and forces and stresses in the post.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Orthopaedic Biomechanics, University of Denver, 2390 S. York St., Denver, Colorado 80208, USA.

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Left: Correlation between flexion angle at engagement with the initial post-cam distance, and AP position of the posterior surface of the post. Right: Correlation between post-cam engagement velocity with distance from the center of the condylar radius of curvature at engagement to the point of first contact on the cam, and the initial distance between the post and the cam.
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fig04: Left: Correlation between flexion angle at engagement with the initial post-cam distance, and AP position of the posterior surface of the post. Right: Correlation between post-cam engagement velocity with distance from the center of the condylar radius of curvature at engagement to the point of first contact on the cam, and the initial distance between the post and the cam.

Mentions: The flexion angle at engagement ranged from 23° to 89° among the eight designs, and correlated well (r = 0.97) with the initial distance between the post and the cam (at the start of the squat cycle) and to a lesser non-significant extent the AP position of the posterior surface of the post (r = 0.62, p = 0.1; Fig. 4).


Mechanics of post-cam engagement during simulated dynamic activity.

Fitzpatrick CK, Clary CW, Cyr AJ, Maletsky LP, Rullkoetter PJ - J. Orthop. Res. (2013)

Left: Correlation between flexion angle at engagement with the initial post-cam distance, and AP position of the posterior surface of the post. Right: Correlation between post-cam engagement velocity with distance from the center of the condylar radius of curvature at engagement to the point of first contact on the cam, and the initial distance between the post and the cam.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842834&req=5

fig04: Left: Correlation between flexion angle at engagement with the initial post-cam distance, and AP position of the posterior surface of the post. Right: Correlation between post-cam engagement velocity with distance from the center of the condylar radius of curvature at engagement to the point of first contact on the cam, and the initial distance between the post and the cam.
Mentions: The flexion angle at engagement ranged from 23° to 89° among the eight designs, and correlated well (r = 0.97) with the initial distance between the post and the cam (at the start of the squat cycle) and to a lesser non-significant extent the AP position of the posterior surface of the post (r = 0.62, p = 0.1; Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Flexion angle and post-cam velocity at engagement demonstrated considerable ranges among designs (23°-89°, and 0.05-0.22 mm/°, respectively).Post-cam velocity was correlated (r = 0.89) with tibiofemoral condylar design features.Condylar geometry, in addition to post-cam geometry, played a significant role in minimizing engagement velocity and forces and stresses in the post.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Orthopaedic Biomechanics, University of Denver, 2390 S. York St., Denver, Colorado 80208, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus