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Play, attention, and learning: how do play and timing shape the development of attention and influence classroom learning?

Hedges JH, Adolph KE, Amso D, Bavelier D, Fiez JA, Krubitzer L, McAuley JD, Newcombe NS, Fitzpatrick SM, Ghajar J - Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. (2013)

Bottom Line: We do not yet know how these connections relate to the formation of specific abilities, such as spatial ability, and to learning in formal environments, such as in the classroom.Does play facilitate a shift from reactive to predictive timing, and is its connection to timing unique or particularly significant?This report will outline important research steps that need to be taken in order to address these and other questions about play, human activity, and cognitive functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Trauma Foundation, New York, New York 10007, USA.

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A boy is shown dropping a stone into a puddle. By repeating this predictable activity, he may develop stored representations of the properties of the external world from which accurate predictions of those properties can be formed.
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fig02: A boy is shown dropping a stone into a puddle. By repeating this predictable activity, he may develop stored representations of the properties of the external world from which accurate predictions of those properties can be formed.

Mentions: Following these points, Ghajar considered what it means to play (i.e., how it can be defined). In his view, play may be a biological activity within which predictive timing develops. Play during early childhood coincides with cerebellar granule cell migration and synaptogenesis, and since the cerebellum has a known role in predictive timing, play may be the key to the development of this ability. Young children seem to seek out predictable interactions and then endlessly repeat them. By example, consider a young boy who repeatedly throws stones into a puddle (Fig. 2). He releases the stone, and after a certain period of time, there is a splash. He repeats this action until the expectancy of the splash matches the actual timing of the splash. This may be the result not only of reducing the variability in his motor process for throwing the stone, but also of forming better predictions of the stone’s spatial and temporal dynamics.


Play, attention, and learning: how do play and timing shape the development of attention and influence classroom learning?

Hedges JH, Adolph KE, Amso D, Bavelier D, Fiez JA, Krubitzer L, McAuley JD, Newcombe NS, Fitzpatrick SM, Ghajar J - Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. (2013)

A boy is shown dropping a stone into a puddle. By repeating this predictable activity, he may develop stored representations of the properties of the external world from which accurate predictions of those properties can be formed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842829&req=5

fig02: A boy is shown dropping a stone into a puddle. By repeating this predictable activity, he may develop stored representations of the properties of the external world from which accurate predictions of those properties can be formed.
Mentions: Following these points, Ghajar considered what it means to play (i.e., how it can be defined). In his view, play may be a biological activity within which predictive timing develops. Play during early childhood coincides with cerebellar granule cell migration and synaptogenesis, and since the cerebellum has a known role in predictive timing, play may be the key to the development of this ability. Young children seem to seek out predictable interactions and then endlessly repeat them. By example, consider a young boy who repeatedly throws stones into a puddle (Fig. 2). He releases the stone, and after a certain period of time, there is a splash. He repeats this action until the expectancy of the splash matches the actual timing of the splash. This may be the result not only of reducing the variability in his motor process for throwing the stone, but also of forming better predictions of the stone’s spatial and temporal dynamics.

Bottom Line: We do not yet know how these connections relate to the formation of specific abilities, such as spatial ability, and to learning in formal environments, such as in the classroom.Does play facilitate a shift from reactive to predictive timing, and is its connection to timing unique or particularly significant?This report will outline important research steps that need to be taken in order to address these and other questions about play, human activity, and cognitive functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Trauma Foundation, New York, New York 10007, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus