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The international view of envenoming in Brazil: myths and realities.

Bochner R - J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis (2013)

Bottom Line: The present work offers a critical review of the main estimates undertaken since 1954.It is interesting to note contradictions between textual and graphic information within the same article, variations over time in the work of a same researcher and differences among distinct authors, and that all these issues remain unmentioned or undiscussed.Comparison among such estimates and the data available at the Brazilian Information System on Diseases of Compulsory Declaration (Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação - SINAN) creates an opportunity to identify the degree of imprecision present in those articles, and draws attention to the need for the production of studies at both the regional and national levels, based on concrete data collected at national, state and municipal levels, which has been available on the internet since 2001.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Communication and Scientific and Technological Information on Health (ICICT), Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Av, Brasil, 4365 - Pavilhão Haity Moussatché, sala 206 - 21045-960 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. rosany.bochner@icict.fiocruz.br.

ABSTRACT
Being distant from Brazil's great natural diversity, from its long tradition in the study of snakebites and from the fact that it is one of the few countries which has a national information system for monitoring incidents involving venomous animals, non-Brazilian researchers face risks when estimating the incidence of these accidents in the country. The present work offers a critical review of the main estimates undertaken since 1954. It is interesting to note contradictions between textual and graphic information within the same article, variations over time in the work of a same researcher and differences among distinct authors, and that all these issues remain unmentioned or undiscussed. Comparison among such estimates and the data available at the Brazilian Information System on Diseases of Compulsory Declaration (Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação - SINAN) creates an opportunity to identify the degree of imprecision present in those articles, and draws attention to the need for the production of studies at both the regional and national levels, based on concrete data collected at national, state and municipal levels, which has been available on the internet since 2001.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Areas with high rates of scorpionism worldwide. Reprinted from “Peut-on parler d’une biogéographie du scorpionisme” by W. R. Lourenço, Compte-Rendu des Séances de la Société de Biogéographie, 1988, 64(4), 137–143 [59]. Copyright by W. R. Lourenço and Société de Biogéographie. Reprinted with permission.
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Figure 9: Areas with high rates of scorpionism worldwide. Reprinted from “Peut-on parler d’une biogéographie du scorpionisme” by W. R. Lourenço, Compte-Rendu des Séances de la Société de Biogéographie, 1988, 64(4), 137–143 [59]. Copyright by W. R. Lourenço and Société de Biogéographie. Reprinted with permission.

Mentions: Perusal of the articles used by Chippaux and Goyffon [48] as the sources for the estimates presented in the map reveals nine studies: three with data from the state of Bahia [50-52], two with data from the state of São Paulo [53,54], two with data from the state of Minas Gerais [55,56], one with data from the state of Pará [57] and one with data from the country as a whole [58]. The last one, published in 1996, contains a map showing the distribution of scorpions across the world and those regions which have severe scorpion envenoming problems. This map is reproduced in Figure 8. It is interesting to observe that in 1988 Lourenço [59] had already published a similar map, shown in Figure 9, in which only the three largest areas in red from Figure 8 are represented as having high rates of scorpion stings.


The international view of envenoming in Brazil: myths and realities.

Bochner R - J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis (2013)

Areas with high rates of scorpionism worldwide. Reprinted from “Peut-on parler d’une biogéographie du scorpionisme” by W. R. Lourenço, Compte-Rendu des Séances de la Société de Biogéographie, 1988, 64(4), 137–143 [59]. Copyright by W. R. Lourenço and Société de Biogéographie. Reprinted with permission.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842768&req=5

Figure 9: Areas with high rates of scorpionism worldwide. Reprinted from “Peut-on parler d’une biogéographie du scorpionisme” by W. R. Lourenço, Compte-Rendu des Séances de la Société de Biogéographie, 1988, 64(4), 137–143 [59]. Copyright by W. R. Lourenço and Société de Biogéographie. Reprinted with permission.
Mentions: Perusal of the articles used by Chippaux and Goyffon [48] as the sources for the estimates presented in the map reveals nine studies: three with data from the state of Bahia [50-52], two with data from the state of São Paulo [53,54], two with data from the state of Minas Gerais [55,56], one with data from the state of Pará [57] and one with data from the country as a whole [58]. The last one, published in 1996, contains a map showing the distribution of scorpions across the world and those regions which have severe scorpion envenoming problems. This map is reproduced in Figure 8. It is interesting to observe that in 1988 Lourenço [59] had already published a similar map, shown in Figure 9, in which only the three largest areas in red from Figure 8 are represented as having high rates of scorpion stings.

Bottom Line: The present work offers a critical review of the main estimates undertaken since 1954.It is interesting to note contradictions between textual and graphic information within the same article, variations over time in the work of a same researcher and differences among distinct authors, and that all these issues remain unmentioned or undiscussed.Comparison among such estimates and the data available at the Brazilian Information System on Diseases of Compulsory Declaration (Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação - SINAN) creates an opportunity to identify the degree of imprecision present in those articles, and draws attention to the need for the production of studies at both the regional and national levels, based on concrete data collected at national, state and municipal levels, which has been available on the internet since 2001.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Communication and Scientific and Technological Information on Health (ICICT), Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Av, Brasil, 4365 - Pavilhão Haity Moussatché, sala 206 - 21045-960 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. rosany.bochner@icict.fiocruz.br.

ABSTRACT
Being distant from Brazil's great natural diversity, from its long tradition in the study of snakebites and from the fact that it is one of the few countries which has a national information system for monitoring incidents involving venomous animals, non-Brazilian researchers face risks when estimating the incidence of these accidents in the country. The present work offers a critical review of the main estimates undertaken since 1954. It is interesting to note contradictions between textual and graphic information within the same article, variations over time in the work of a same researcher and differences among distinct authors, and that all these issues remain unmentioned or undiscussed. Comparison among such estimates and the data available at the Brazilian Information System on Diseases of Compulsory Declaration (Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação - SINAN) creates an opportunity to identify the degree of imprecision present in those articles, and draws attention to the need for the production of studies at both the regional and national levels, based on concrete data collected at national, state and municipal levels, which has been available on the internet since 2001.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus