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Configuration of the inferior alveolar canal as detected by cone beam computed tomography.

Nair UP, Yazdi MH, Nayar GM, Parry H, Katkar RA, Nair MK - J Conserv Dent (2013)

Bottom Line: IACs were noted to course superiorly toward the root apices from the second molar to the first premolar and closer to the buccal cortical plate anteriorly.This study indicates that caution needs to be exercised during endodontic surgical procedures in the mandible even at the level of the canine.CBVCT seems to provide an optimal, low-dose, 3D imaging modality to help address the complexities in canal configuration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endodontics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Florida, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the course of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) including its frequently seen variations in relation to root apices and the cortices of the mandible at fixed pre-determined anatomic reference points using cone beam volumetric computed tomography (CBVCT).

Material and methods: This retrospective study utilized CBVCT images from 44 patients to obtain quantifiable data to localize the IAC. Measurements to the IAC were made from the buccal and lingual cortical plates (BCP/LCP), inferior border of the mandible and the root apices of the mandibular posterior teeth and canine. Descriptive analysis was used to map out the course of the IAC.

Results: IACs were noted to course superiorly toward the root apices from the second molar to the first premolar and closer to the buccal cortical plate anteriorly. The canal was closest to the LCP at the level of the second molar. In 32.95% of the cases, the canal was seen at the level of the canine.

Conclusions: This study indicates that caution needs to be exercised during endodontic surgical procedures in the mandible even at the level of the canine. CBVCT seems to provide an optimal, low-dose, 3D imaging modality to help address the complexities in canal configuration.

No MeSH data available.


Sagittal slice of a cone beam computed tomography image illustrating measurement of the inferior alveolar canal from the buccal and lingual cortical plates, inferior border of the mandible and apices of the teeth
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Figure 1: Sagittal slice of a cone beam computed tomography image illustrating measurement of the inferior alveolar canal from the buccal and lingual cortical plates, inferior border of the mandible and apices of the teeth

Mentions: Institutional review board approval was sought to evaluate existing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) records of 44 patients in the age group of 18-70 years acquired using the iCAT, (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA). These were randomly selected for the study. The selected patients had fully erupted mandibular posterior teeth and canines on both sides. CBCT studies showing evidence of severe periodontal disease, osteoradionecrosis or osteochemonecrosis, other hard tissue pathology, apical root resorption, and previous endodontic surgery were excluded from the study. The images were then reviewed by two examiners including a board certified oral and maxillofacial Radiologist and an Endodontist, using InVivo (Anatomage, San Jose, CA, USA) viewing software. Measurements from the IAC to the root apices of the first molar, first and second premolar and the canine was obtained from parasagittal reformatted images. Other measurements included the distance from the IAC to the buccal and lingual cortical plates (LCP) from the respective boundaries of the IAC, parallel to the X-axis on paracoronal slices at the above locations, as well as to the superior and inferior borders of the mandible, parallel to the Y-axis [Figure 1]. All measurements were repeated after a period of at least 2 weeks. The average of both readings for each site was recorded for analyses.


Configuration of the inferior alveolar canal as detected by cone beam computed tomography.

Nair UP, Yazdi MH, Nayar GM, Parry H, Katkar RA, Nair MK - J Conserv Dent (2013)

Sagittal slice of a cone beam computed tomography image illustrating measurement of the inferior alveolar canal from the buccal and lingual cortical plates, inferior border of the mandible and apices of the teeth
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842719&req=5

Figure 1: Sagittal slice of a cone beam computed tomography image illustrating measurement of the inferior alveolar canal from the buccal and lingual cortical plates, inferior border of the mandible and apices of the teeth
Mentions: Institutional review board approval was sought to evaluate existing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) records of 44 patients in the age group of 18-70 years acquired using the iCAT, (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA). These were randomly selected for the study. The selected patients had fully erupted mandibular posterior teeth and canines on both sides. CBCT studies showing evidence of severe periodontal disease, osteoradionecrosis or osteochemonecrosis, other hard tissue pathology, apical root resorption, and previous endodontic surgery were excluded from the study. The images were then reviewed by two examiners including a board certified oral and maxillofacial Radiologist and an Endodontist, using InVivo (Anatomage, San Jose, CA, USA) viewing software. Measurements from the IAC to the root apices of the first molar, first and second premolar and the canine was obtained from parasagittal reformatted images. Other measurements included the distance from the IAC to the buccal and lingual cortical plates (LCP) from the respective boundaries of the IAC, parallel to the X-axis on paracoronal slices at the above locations, as well as to the superior and inferior borders of the mandible, parallel to the Y-axis [Figure 1]. All measurements were repeated after a period of at least 2 weeks. The average of both readings for each site was recorded for analyses.

Bottom Line: IACs were noted to course superiorly toward the root apices from the second molar to the first premolar and closer to the buccal cortical plate anteriorly.This study indicates that caution needs to be exercised during endodontic surgical procedures in the mandible even at the level of the canine.CBVCT seems to provide an optimal, low-dose, 3D imaging modality to help address the complexities in canal configuration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endodontics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Florida, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the course of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) including its frequently seen variations in relation to root apices and the cortices of the mandible at fixed pre-determined anatomic reference points using cone beam volumetric computed tomography (CBVCT).

Material and methods: This retrospective study utilized CBVCT images from 44 patients to obtain quantifiable data to localize the IAC. Measurements to the IAC were made from the buccal and lingual cortical plates (BCP/LCP), inferior border of the mandible and the root apices of the mandibular posterior teeth and canine. Descriptive analysis was used to map out the course of the IAC.

Results: IACs were noted to course superiorly toward the root apices from the second molar to the first premolar and closer to the buccal cortical plate anteriorly. The canal was closest to the LCP at the level of the second molar. In 32.95% of the cases, the canal was seen at the level of the canine.

Conclusions: This study indicates that caution needs to be exercised during endodontic surgical procedures in the mandible even at the level of the canine. CBVCT seems to provide an optimal, low-dose, 3D imaging modality to help address the complexities in canal configuration.

No MeSH data available.