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Iodine isotopes species fingerprinting environmental conditions in surface water along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.

He P, Hou X, Aldahan A, Possnert G, Yi P - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: The results show iodate as the predominant species in the analyzed marine waters for both (127)I and (129)I.Despite the rather constant ratios of (127)I(-)/(127)IO3(-), the (129)I(-)/(129)IO3(-) values reveal variations that apparently response to sources, environmental conditions and residence time.These findings provide a new tracer approach that will strongly enhance the application of anthropogenic (129)I in ocean environments and impact on climate at the ocean boundary layer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Geochemistry, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China [2] Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavägen 16, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Concentrations and species of iodine isotopes ((127)I and (129)I) provide vital information about iodine geochemistry, environmental conditions and water masses exchange in oceans. Despite extensive investigations of anthropogenic (129)I in the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, concentrations of the isotope in the Atlantic Ocean are, however, still unknown. We here present first data on (129)I and (127)I, and their species (iodide and iodate) in surface water transect along the northeastern Atlantic between 30° and 50°N. The results show iodate as the predominant species in the analyzed marine waters for both (127)I and (129)I. Despite the rather constant ratios of (127)I(-)/(127)IO3(-), the (129)I(-)/(129)IO3(-) values reveal variations that apparently response to sources, environmental conditions and residence time. These findings provide a new tracer approach that will strongly enhance the application of anthropogenic (129)I in ocean environments and impact on climate at the ocean boundary layer.

No MeSH data available.


Iodine isotopes (127I and 129I) and their species in the Atlantic seawaters.(a) Concentration of total iodine (127I) and its species (127I− and 127IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (b) Variations of isotopic ratio of 129I/127I, 127I−/129I− and 127IO3−/129IO3− in the sampled transect along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (c) Concentration of 129I and its species (129I− and 129IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.
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f2: Iodine isotopes (127I and 129I) and their species in the Atlantic seawaters.(a) Concentration of total iodine (127I) and its species (127I− and 127IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (b) Variations of isotopic ratio of 129I/127I, 127I−/129I− and 127IO3−/129IO3− in the sampled transect along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (c) Concentration of 129I and its species (129I− and 129IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.

Mentions: The concentrations of total iodine (127I) and its species (127I− and 127IO3−) in the sampled surface water of the North Atlantic Ocean are shown in Fig. 2a and listed in Supplementary Table S1. In general, surface concentrations of total iodine and its species (iodate and iodide), show a fairly small variation in the samples from the break of Celtic Slope to the east of Madeira Archipelago. It seems that 127I and its species, iodate and iodide, show rather constant values in the surface water of the open sea, with mean concentrations of 0.39, 0.35 and 0.05 μM, respectively. The range of iodide is 0.02 to 0.08 μM and the lowest concentration of iodide occurred along the shelf break of the Celtic Sea (sample 1) while the two pronounced peaks (sample 6 and 14) appear in the north and middle parts of the Portugal coastal region. Unlike the iodide, the concentrations of total iodine is positively correlated with iodate (r2 = 0.5), which suggests rather similar distribution trend for both 127I and 127IO3−. The highest concentrations are in the area off the Cape St Vicente, whereas the minimum values occurred in the northeast of Madeira. More than 75% of 127I-iodate is observed in these surface waters, which is comparable to seawaters collected in any other ocean regions (Supplementary Table S2).


Iodine isotopes species fingerprinting environmental conditions in surface water along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.

He P, Hou X, Aldahan A, Possnert G, Yi P - Sci Rep (2013)

Iodine isotopes (127I and 129I) and their species in the Atlantic seawaters.(a) Concentration of total iodine (127I) and its species (127I− and 127IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (b) Variations of isotopic ratio of 129I/127I, 127I−/129I− and 127IO3−/129IO3− in the sampled transect along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (c) Concentration of 129I and its species (129I− and 129IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842550&req=5

f2: Iodine isotopes (127I and 129I) and their species in the Atlantic seawaters.(a) Concentration of total iodine (127I) and its species (127I− and 127IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (b) Variations of isotopic ratio of 129I/127I, 127I−/129I− and 127IO3−/129IO3− in the sampled transect along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. (c) Concentration of 129I and its species (129I− and 129IO3−) along the sampled transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.
Mentions: The concentrations of total iodine (127I) and its species (127I− and 127IO3−) in the sampled surface water of the North Atlantic Ocean are shown in Fig. 2a and listed in Supplementary Table S1. In general, surface concentrations of total iodine and its species (iodate and iodide), show a fairly small variation in the samples from the break of Celtic Slope to the east of Madeira Archipelago. It seems that 127I and its species, iodate and iodide, show rather constant values in the surface water of the open sea, with mean concentrations of 0.39, 0.35 and 0.05 μM, respectively. The range of iodide is 0.02 to 0.08 μM and the lowest concentration of iodide occurred along the shelf break of the Celtic Sea (sample 1) while the two pronounced peaks (sample 6 and 14) appear in the north and middle parts of the Portugal coastal region. Unlike the iodide, the concentrations of total iodine is positively correlated with iodate (r2 = 0.5), which suggests rather similar distribution trend for both 127I and 127IO3−. The highest concentrations are in the area off the Cape St Vicente, whereas the minimum values occurred in the northeast of Madeira. More than 75% of 127I-iodate is observed in these surface waters, which is comparable to seawaters collected in any other ocean regions (Supplementary Table S2).

Bottom Line: The results show iodate as the predominant species in the analyzed marine waters for both (127)I and (129)I.Despite the rather constant ratios of (127)I(-)/(127)IO3(-), the (129)I(-)/(129)IO3(-) values reveal variations that apparently response to sources, environmental conditions and residence time.These findings provide a new tracer approach that will strongly enhance the application of anthropogenic (129)I in ocean environments and impact on climate at the ocean boundary layer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Geochemistry, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China [2] Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavägen 16, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Concentrations and species of iodine isotopes ((127)I and (129)I) provide vital information about iodine geochemistry, environmental conditions and water masses exchange in oceans. Despite extensive investigations of anthropogenic (129)I in the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, concentrations of the isotope in the Atlantic Ocean are, however, still unknown. We here present first data on (129)I and (127)I, and their species (iodide and iodate) in surface water transect along the northeastern Atlantic between 30° and 50°N. The results show iodate as the predominant species in the analyzed marine waters for both (127)I and (129)I. Despite the rather constant ratios of (127)I(-)/(127)IO3(-), the (129)I(-)/(129)IO3(-) values reveal variations that apparently response to sources, environmental conditions and residence time. These findings provide a new tracer approach that will strongly enhance the application of anthropogenic (129)I in ocean environments and impact on climate at the ocean boundary layer.

No MeSH data available.