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A new oviraptorosaur (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria) from the late cretaceous of southern China and its paleoecological implications.

Lü J, Yi L, Zhong H, Wei X - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Phylogenetic analysis recovers Nankangia as basal to the oviraptorid Yulong, but more derived than Caenagnathus, which also has a mandibular symphysis that is not turned down.The coexistence of Nankangia jiangxiensis, Ganzhousaurus nankangensis, Jiangxisaurus ganzhouensis, an unnamed oviraptorid from Nanxiong Basin and Banji long suggests that they occupied distinct ecological niches.Nankangia may have been more herbivorous than carnivorous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
A new oviraptorosaur Nankangia jiangxiensis gen. et sp. nov. is described on the basis of a partial postcranial skeleton with a partial lower jaw collected from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou, in Jiangxi Province of southern China. The new taxon is diagnosed by: (1) a mandibular symphysis that is not turned down; (2) neural spines of the cranial caudal vertebrae that are wider transversely than anteroposteriorly, forming a large posterior fossa with rugose central areas; (3) a femoral neck extending at an angle of about 90 to the shaft; and (4) a ratio of femur to tibia length of 0.95. Phylogenetic analysis recovers Nankangia as basal to the oviraptorid Yulong, but more derived than Caenagnathus, which also has a mandibular symphysis that is not turned down. The coexistence of Nankangia jiangxiensis, Ganzhousaurus nankangensis, Jiangxisaurus ganzhouensis, an unnamed oviraptorid from Nanxiong Basin and Banji long suggests that they occupied distinct ecological niches. Nankangia may have been more herbivorous than carnivorous.

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Map of the fossil locality, near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The solid pentagon represents the fossil site.
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pone-0080557-g001: Map of the fossil locality, near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The solid pentagon represents the fossil site.

Mentions: Oviraptorids are specialized non-avian theropod dinosaurs that have been reported from Mongolia [1]–[12] and China [13]–[23]. The closely related caenagnathids are best known from North America 31 [24]–[29]. Oviraptorosaurs are known from many regions of China [13]–[18], [21]–[23], [30], [31]. Recently, many oviraptorosaur nests and eggs, along with at least ten oviraptorosaur skeletons buried with the eggs (All oviraptorosaur skeletons that have been published from the Ganzhou area thus far are incomplete because, during quarrying of the rocks for building material, most specimens are destroyed) has made the Ganzhou district one of the most productive localities for oviraptorosaur fossils. Here we report on a new oviraptorosaur, Nankangia jiangxiensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Nankang City, Jiangxi Province (Figure 1). Its discovery plays a key role in our understanding of the distribution and paleoecology of oviraptorosaurian dinosaurs.


A new oviraptorosaur (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria) from the late cretaceous of southern China and its paleoecological implications.

Lü J, Yi L, Zhong H, Wei X - PLoS ONE (2013)

Map of the fossil locality, near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The solid pentagon represents the fossil site.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842309&req=5

pone-0080557-g001: Map of the fossil locality, near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The solid pentagon represents the fossil site.
Mentions: Oviraptorids are specialized non-avian theropod dinosaurs that have been reported from Mongolia [1]–[12] and China [13]–[23]. The closely related caenagnathids are best known from North America 31 [24]–[29]. Oviraptorosaurs are known from many regions of China [13]–[18], [21]–[23], [30], [31]. Recently, many oviraptorosaur nests and eggs, along with at least ten oviraptorosaur skeletons buried with the eggs (All oviraptorosaur skeletons that have been published from the Ganzhou area thus far are incomplete because, during quarrying of the rocks for building material, most specimens are destroyed) has made the Ganzhou district one of the most productive localities for oviraptorosaur fossils. Here we report on a new oviraptorosaur, Nankangia jiangxiensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Nankang City, Jiangxi Province (Figure 1). Its discovery plays a key role in our understanding of the distribution and paleoecology of oviraptorosaurian dinosaurs.

Bottom Line: Phylogenetic analysis recovers Nankangia as basal to the oviraptorid Yulong, but more derived than Caenagnathus, which also has a mandibular symphysis that is not turned down.The coexistence of Nankangia jiangxiensis, Ganzhousaurus nankangensis, Jiangxisaurus ganzhouensis, an unnamed oviraptorid from Nanxiong Basin and Banji long suggests that they occupied distinct ecological niches.Nankangia may have been more herbivorous than carnivorous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
A new oviraptorosaur Nankangia jiangxiensis gen. et sp. nov. is described on the basis of a partial postcranial skeleton with a partial lower jaw collected from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou, in Jiangxi Province of southern China. The new taxon is diagnosed by: (1) a mandibular symphysis that is not turned down; (2) neural spines of the cranial caudal vertebrae that are wider transversely than anteroposteriorly, forming a large posterior fossa with rugose central areas; (3) a femoral neck extending at an angle of about 90 to the shaft; and (4) a ratio of femur to tibia length of 0.95. Phylogenetic analysis recovers Nankangia as basal to the oviraptorid Yulong, but more derived than Caenagnathus, which also has a mandibular symphysis that is not turned down. The coexistence of Nankangia jiangxiensis, Ganzhousaurus nankangensis, Jiangxisaurus ganzhouensis, an unnamed oviraptorid from Nanxiong Basin and Banji long suggests that they occupied distinct ecological niches. Nankangia may have been more herbivorous than carnivorous.

Show MeSH