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Drive for consumption, craving, and connectivity in the visual cortex during the imagery of desired food.

Bullins J, Laurienti PJ, Morgan AR, Norris J, Paolini BM, Rejeski WJ - Front Aging Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: There is considerable interest in understanding food cravings given the obesogenic environment of Western Society.On 1 day they consumed a BOOST(®) liquid meal after the period of food restriction, whereas on the other day they only consumed water (NO BOOST(®) condition).Furthermore, local efficiency within the visual cortex when imaging desired food was higher for those scoring high as compared to low on the PFS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
There is considerable interest in understanding food cravings given the obesogenic environment of Western Society. In this paper we examine how the imagery of palatable foods affects cravings and functional connectivity in the visual cortex for people who differ on the power of food scale (PFS). Fourteen older, overweight/obese adults came to our laboratory on two different occasions. Both times they ate a controlled breakfast meal and then were restricted from eating for 2.5 h prior to scanning. On 1 day they consumed a BOOST(®) liquid meal after the period of food restriction, whereas on the other day they only consumed water (NO BOOST(®) condition). After these manipulations, they had an fMRI scan in which they were asked to image both neutral objects and their favorite snack foods; they also completed visual analog scales for craving, hunger, and the vividness of the imagery experiences. Irrespective of the BOOST(®) manipulation, we observed marked increases in food cravings when older, overweight/obese adults created images of favorite foods in their minds as opposed to creating an image of neutral objects; however, the increase in food craving following the imagery of desired food was more pronounced among those scoring high than low on the PFS. Furthermore, local efficiency within the visual cortex when imaging desired food was higher for those scoring high as compared to low on the PFS. The active imagery of desired foods seemed to have overpowered the BOOST(®) manipulation when evaluating connectivity in the visual cortex.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Visit progression from phone screening to scan visits, indicating points of collection for PFS (1), CCEBstate (2), and VAS (3) scores.
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Figure 1: Visit progression from phone screening to scan visits, indicating points of collection for PFS (1), CCEBstate (2), and VAS (3) scores.

Mentions: Participants completed two 5 h visits beginning in the early morning around 8:00 a.m. Participants arrived in a fasting state, having not eaten breakfast, or drank anything other than water. During each visit, participants consumed a prepared breakfast containing 350 calories for females and 450 calories for males. The meals were designed by a staff nutritionist to provide a heart healthy balance of macronutrients containing approximately 25% fat, 15% protein, and 60% carbohydrates. Participants were allowed to choose macronutrients from a menu. Following the consumption of at least 75% of their breakfast, participants completed the Confidence for controlling eating behavior (CCEBstate). The participants then fasted for 2.5 h under the supervision of research staff (see Figure 1 for overview of study design).


Drive for consumption, craving, and connectivity in the visual cortex during the imagery of desired food.

Bullins J, Laurienti PJ, Morgan AR, Norris J, Paolini BM, Rejeski WJ - Front Aging Neurosci (2013)

Visit progression from phone screening to scan visits, indicating points of collection for PFS (1), CCEBstate (2), and VAS (3) scores.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3842155&req=5

Figure 1: Visit progression from phone screening to scan visits, indicating points of collection for PFS (1), CCEBstate (2), and VAS (3) scores.
Mentions: Participants completed two 5 h visits beginning in the early morning around 8:00 a.m. Participants arrived in a fasting state, having not eaten breakfast, or drank anything other than water. During each visit, participants consumed a prepared breakfast containing 350 calories for females and 450 calories for males. The meals were designed by a staff nutritionist to provide a heart healthy balance of macronutrients containing approximately 25% fat, 15% protein, and 60% carbohydrates. Participants were allowed to choose macronutrients from a menu. Following the consumption of at least 75% of their breakfast, participants completed the Confidence for controlling eating behavior (CCEBstate). The participants then fasted for 2.5 h under the supervision of research staff (see Figure 1 for overview of study design).

Bottom Line: There is considerable interest in understanding food cravings given the obesogenic environment of Western Society.On 1 day they consumed a BOOST(®) liquid meal after the period of food restriction, whereas on the other day they only consumed water (NO BOOST(®) condition).Furthermore, local efficiency within the visual cortex when imaging desired food was higher for those scoring high as compared to low on the PFS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
There is considerable interest in understanding food cravings given the obesogenic environment of Western Society. In this paper we examine how the imagery of palatable foods affects cravings and functional connectivity in the visual cortex for people who differ on the power of food scale (PFS). Fourteen older, overweight/obese adults came to our laboratory on two different occasions. Both times they ate a controlled breakfast meal and then were restricted from eating for 2.5 h prior to scanning. On 1 day they consumed a BOOST(®) liquid meal after the period of food restriction, whereas on the other day they only consumed water (NO BOOST(®) condition). After these manipulations, they had an fMRI scan in which they were asked to image both neutral objects and their favorite snack foods; they also completed visual analog scales for craving, hunger, and the vividness of the imagery experiences. Irrespective of the BOOST(®) manipulation, we observed marked increases in food cravings when older, overweight/obese adults created images of favorite foods in their minds as opposed to creating an image of neutral objects; however, the increase in food craving following the imagery of desired food was more pronounced among those scoring high than low on the PFS. Furthermore, local efficiency within the visual cortex when imaging desired food was higher for those scoring high as compared to low on the PFS. The active imagery of desired foods seemed to have overpowered the BOOST(®) manipulation when evaluating connectivity in the visual cortex.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus