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The miR-17/92 cluster: a comprehensive update on its genomics, genetics, functions and increasingly important and numerous roles in health and disease.

Mogilyansky E, Rigoutsos I - Cell Death Differ. (2013)

Bottom Line: The miR-17/92 cluster is among the best-studied microRNA clusters.Interest in the cluster and its members has been increasing steadily and the number of publications has grown exponentially since its discovery with more than 1000 articles published in 2012 alone.In light of its ever-increasing importance and ever-widening regulatory roles, we review here the latest body of knowledge on the cluster's involvement in health and disease as well as provide a novel perspective on the full spectrum of protein-coding and non-coding transcripts that are likely regulated by its members.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Computational Medicine Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

ABSTRACT
The miR-17/92 cluster is among the best-studied microRNA clusters. Interest in the cluster and its members has been increasing steadily and the number of publications has grown exponentially since its discovery with more than 1000 articles published in 2012 alone. Originally found to be involved in tumorigenesis, research work in recent years has uncovered unexpected roles for its members in a wide variety of settings that include normal development, immune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and aging. In light of its ever-increasing importance and ever-widening regulatory roles, we review here the latest body of knowledge on the cluster's involvement in health and disease as well as provide a novel perspective on the full spectrum of protein-coding and non-coding transcripts that are likely regulated by its members.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Genomic representation of the human miR-17-92 cluster host gene (MIR17HG) and neighborhood genes on Chr 13q31.1-q33-1. (a) Genomic representation of genes located±10 kb around human MIR17HG. (b) Genomic representation of MIR17HG. Two transcripts are shown in light blue and individual members of the cluster represented as red rectangles. The two panels were created using the UCSC genome browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/)
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fig1: Genomic representation of the human miR-17-92 cluster host gene (MIR17HG) and neighborhood genes on Chr 13q31.1-q33-1. (a) Genomic representation of genes located±10 kb around human MIR17HG. (b) Genomic representation of MIR17HG. Two transcripts are shown in light blue and individual members of the cluster represented as red rectangles. The two panels were created using the UCSC genome browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/)

Mentions: In 2004, a novel gene, ‘chromosome 13 open reading frame 25' or C13orf25 for short, was identified.9 Analysis of 70 human B-cell lymphoma cases showed amplification of this region.9 The miR-17/92 cluster as it is now known is located in the locus of the non-protein-coding gene MIR17HG (the miR-17/92 cluster host gene) (also known as C13orf25). The miR-17/92 cluster transcript spans 800 nts10, 11 out of MIR17HG's 7 kb and comprises six miRNAs: miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-20a, miR-19b-1 and miR-92a-1 (Figure 1). The miR-17/92 cluster is conserved among vertebrates.12 Soon after its discovery, the ectopic expression of a truncated version of the cluster (lacking miR-92) in B-cell lymphoma revealed its oncogenic character and miR-17/92 was given the distinction of being the first ‘oncomir'.13


The miR-17/92 cluster: a comprehensive update on its genomics, genetics, functions and increasingly important and numerous roles in health and disease.

Mogilyansky E, Rigoutsos I - Cell Death Differ. (2013)

Genomic representation of the human miR-17-92 cluster host gene (MIR17HG) and neighborhood genes on Chr 13q31.1-q33-1. (a) Genomic representation of genes located±10 kb around human MIR17HG. (b) Genomic representation of MIR17HG. Two transcripts are shown in light blue and individual members of the cluster represented as red rectangles. The two panels were created using the UCSC genome browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824591&req=5

fig1: Genomic representation of the human miR-17-92 cluster host gene (MIR17HG) and neighborhood genes on Chr 13q31.1-q33-1. (a) Genomic representation of genes located±10 kb around human MIR17HG. (b) Genomic representation of MIR17HG. Two transcripts are shown in light blue and individual members of the cluster represented as red rectangles. The two panels were created using the UCSC genome browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/)
Mentions: In 2004, a novel gene, ‘chromosome 13 open reading frame 25' or C13orf25 for short, was identified.9 Analysis of 70 human B-cell lymphoma cases showed amplification of this region.9 The miR-17/92 cluster as it is now known is located in the locus of the non-protein-coding gene MIR17HG (the miR-17/92 cluster host gene) (also known as C13orf25). The miR-17/92 cluster transcript spans 800 nts10, 11 out of MIR17HG's 7 kb and comprises six miRNAs: miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-20a, miR-19b-1 and miR-92a-1 (Figure 1). The miR-17/92 cluster is conserved among vertebrates.12 Soon after its discovery, the ectopic expression of a truncated version of the cluster (lacking miR-92) in B-cell lymphoma revealed its oncogenic character and miR-17/92 was given the distinction of being the first ‘oncomir'.13

Bottom Line: The miR-17/92 cluster is among the best-studied microRNA clusters.Interest in the cluster and its members has been increasing steadily and the number of publications has grown exponentially since its discovery with more than 1000 articles published in 2012 alone.In light of its ever-increasing importance and ever-widening regulatory roles, we review here the latest body of knowledge on the cluster's involvement in health and disease as well as provide a novel perspective on the full spectrum of protein-coding and non-coding transcripts that are likely regulated by its members.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Computational Medicine Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

ABSTRACT
The miR-17/92 cluster is among the best-studied microRNA clusters. Interest in the cluster and its members has been increasing steadily and the number of publications has grown exponentially since its discovery with more than 1000 articles published in 2012 alone. Originally found to be involved in tumorigenesis, research work in recent years has uncovered unexpected roles for its members in a wide variety of settings that include normal development, immune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and aging. In light of its ever-increasing importance and ever-widening regulatory roles, we review here the latest body of knowledge on the cluster's involvement in health and disease as well as provide a novel perspective on the full spectrum of protein-coding and non-coding transcripts that are likely regulated by its members.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus