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Lung cancer risk from radon in Ontario, Canada: how many lung cancers can we prevent?

Peterson E, Aker A, Kim J, Li Y, Brand K, Copes R - Cancer Causes Control (2013)

Bottom Line: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.There was important variation across health units.Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Ontario, 300-480 University Ave., Toronto, ON, M5G 1V2, Canada, emily.peterson@oahpp.ca.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To calculate the burden of lung cancer illness due to radon for all thirty-six health units in Ontario and determine the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths that could be prevented.

Methods: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.

Results: It is estimated that 13.6 % (95 % CI 11.0, 16.7) of lung cancer deaths in Ontario are attributable to radon, corresponding to 847 (95 % CI 686, 1,039) lung cancer deaths each year, approximately 84 % of these in ever-smokers. If all homes above 200 Bq/m(3), the current Canadian guideline, were remediated to background levels, it is estimated that 91 lung cancer deaths could be prevented each year, 233 if remediation was performed at 100 Bq/m(3). There was important variation across health units.

Conclusions: Radon is an important contributor to lung cancer deaths in Ontario. A large portion of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths are from exposures below the current Canadian guideline, suggesting interventions that install effective radon-preventive measures into buildings at build may be a good alternative population prevention strategy to testing and remediation. For some health units, testing and remediation may also prevent a portion of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon for both ever-smokers and never-smokers combined at current radon levels and various radon cutoffs by Ontario health units in order of decreasing PAR %. We will make health unit identifiers available upon request
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Fig2: Mean population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon for both ever-smokers and never-smokers combined at current radon levels and various radon cutoffs by Ontario health units in order of decreasing PAR %. We will make health unit identifiers available upon request

Mentions: There is a wide range in estimated PAR % values for health units across Ontario (Fig. 2). The results for two of the thirty-six health units with the highest (HU1) and lowest (HU2) estimated PAR % values are displayed in Table 1. The lowest mean estimated PAR % for ever-smokers and never-smokers combined is 9.1 %, while the highest is 25.3 %. However, in this case, population size differences between the two regions compensated for the PAR % differences resulting in similar lung cancer deaths attributable to radon between these health units, at 24 and 21 lung cancer deaths per year respectively. Although not shown in this example, variation in the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths between health units was observed with a mean of 25 and a standard deviation of 17.Fig. 2


Lung cancer risk from radon in Ontario, Canada: how many lung cancers can we prevent?

Peterson E, Aker A, Kim J, Li Y, Brand K, Copes R - Cancer Causes Control (2013)

Mean population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon for both ever-smokers and never-smokers combined at current radon levels and various radon cutoffs by Ontario health units in order of decreasing PAR %. We will make health unit identifiers available upon request
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824583&req=5

Fig2: Mean population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon for both ever-smokers and never-smokers combined at current radon levels and various radon cutoffs by Ontario health units in order of decreasing PAR %. We will make health unit identifiers available upon request
Mentions: There is a wide range in estimated PAR % values for health units across Ontario (Fig. 2). The results for two of the thirty-six health units with the highest (HU1) and lowest (HU2) estimated PAR % values are displayed in Table 1. The lowest mean estimated PAR % for ever-smokers and never-smokers combined is 9.1 %, while the highest is 25.3 %. However, in this case, population size differences between the two regions compensated for the PAR % differences resulting in similar lung cancer deaths attributable to radon between these health units, at 24 and 21 lung cancer deaths per year respectively. Although not shown in this example, variation in the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths between health units was observed with a mean of 25 and a standard deviation of 17.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.There was important variation across health units.Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Ontario, 300-480 University Ave., Toronto, ON, M5G 1V2, Canada, emily.peterson@oahpp.ca.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To calculate the burden of lung cancer illness due to radon for all thirty-six health units in Ontario and determine the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths that could be prevented.

Methods: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.

Results: It is estimated that 13.6 % (95 % CI 11.0, 16.7) of lung cancer deaths in Ontario are attributable to radon, corresponding to 847 (95 % CI 686, 1,039) lung cancer deaths each year, approximately 84 % of these in ever-smokers. If all homes above 200 Bq/m(3), the current Canadian guideline, were remediated to background levels, it is estimated that 91 lung cancer deaths could be prevented each year, 233 if remediation was performed at 100 Bq/m(3). There was important variation across health units.

Conclusions: Radon is an important contributor to lung cancer deaths in Ontario. A large portion of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths are from exposures below the current Canadian guideline, suggesting interventions that install effective radon-preventive measures into buildings at build may be a good alternative population prevention strategy to testing and remediation. For some health units, testing and remediation may also prevent a portion of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus