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Lung cancer risk from radon in Ontario, Canada: how many lung cancers can we prevent?

Peterson E, Aker A, Kim J, Li Y, Brand K, Copes R - Cancer Causes Control (2013)

Bottom Line: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.There was important variation across health units.Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Ontario, 300-480 University Ave., Toronto, ON, M5G 1V2, Canada, emily.peterson@oahpp.ca.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To calculate the burden of lung cancer illness due to radon for all thirty-six health units in Ontario and determine the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths that could be prevented.

Methods: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.

Results: It is estimated that 13.6 % (95 % CI 11.0, 16.7) of lung cancer deaths in Ontario are attributable to radon, corresponding to 847 (95 % CI 686, 1,039) lung cancer deaths each year, approximately 84 % of these in ever-smokers. If all homes above 200 Bq/m(3), the current Canadian guideline, were remediated to background levels, it is estimated that 91 lung cancer deaths could be prevented each year, 233 if remediation was performed at 100 Bq/m(3). There was important variation across health units.

Conclusions: Radon is an important contributor to lung cancer deaths in Ontario. A large portion of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths are from exposures below the current Canadian guideline, suggesting interventions that install effective radon-preventive measures into buildings at build may be a good alternative population prevention strategy to testing and remediation. For some health units, testing and remediation may also prevent a portion of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of methodology used to calculate the life-years lost (LYL), excess life-time risk ratio (ELRR), and population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon. ACS = American Cancer Society, CCHS = Canadian Community Health Survey
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Fig1: Flow diagram of methodology used to calculate the life-years lost (LYL), excess life-time risk ratio (ELRR), and population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon. ACS = American Cancer Society, CCHS = Canadian Community Health Survey

Mentions: The method proposed by Brand et al. [5] was implemented using Ontario-specific data sources. These methods were based on the exposure-age-concentration model from the BEIR-VI report [3]. See Fig. 1 for an overview of the methods used to calculate the population attributable risk percent (PAR %), excess life-time risk ratio (ELRR), and life-years lost (LYL). Further analysis was performed to find the number of deaths attributable to radon exposure and the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths that can be prevented if all homes above 50, 100, 150 and 200 Bq/m3 were reduced to background levels. The methodologies and data sources are described below.Fig. 1


Lung cancer risk from radon in Ontario, Canada: how many lung cancers can we prevent?

Peterson E, Aker A, Kim J, Li Y, Brand K, Copes R - Cancer Causes Control (2013)

Flow diagram of methodology used to calculate the life-years lost (LYL), excess life-time risk ratio (ELRR), and population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon. ACS = American Cancer Society, CCHS = Canadian Community Health Survey
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824583&req=5

Fig1: Flow diagram of methodology used to calculate the life-years lost (LYL), excess life-time risk ratio (ELRR), and population attributable risk percent (PAR %) of lung cancer deaths due to radon. ACS = American Cancer Society, CCHS = Canadian Community Health Survey
Mentions: The method proposed by Brand et al. [5] was implemented using Ontario-specific data sources. These methods were based on the exposure-age-concentration model from the BEIR-VI report [3]. See Fig. 1 for an overview of the methods used to calculate the population attributable risk percent (PAR %), excess life-time risk ratio (ELRR), and life-years lost (LYL). Further analysis was performed to find the number of deaths attributable to radon exposure and the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths that can be prevented if all homes above 50, 100, 150 and 200 Bq/m3 were reduced to background levels. The methodologies and data sources are described below.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.There was important variation across health units.Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Ontario, 300-480 University Ave., Toronto, ON, M5G 1V2, Canada, emily.peterson@oahpp.ca.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To calculate the burden of lung cancer illness due to radon for all thirty-six health units in Ontario and determine the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths that could be prevented.

Methods: We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels.

Results: It is estimated that 13.6 % (95 % CI 11.0, 16.7) of lung cancer deaths in Ontario are attributable to radon, corresponding to 847 (95 % CI 686, 1,039) lung cancer deaths each year, approximately 84 % of these in ever-smokers. If all homes above 200 Bq/m(3), the current Canadian guideline, were remediated to background levels, it is estimated that 91 lung cancer deaths could be prevented each year, 233 if remediation was performed at 100 Bq/m(3). There was important variation across health units.

Conclusions: Radon is an important contributor to lung cancer deaths in Ontario. A large portion of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths are from exposures below the current Canadian guideline, suggesting interventions that install effective radon-preventive measures into buildings at build may be a good alternative population prevention strategy to testing and remediation. For some health units, testing and remediation may also prevent a portion of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus