Limits...
Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and their HLA-C ligands in a Ugandan population.

Nakimuli A, Chazara O, Farrell L, Hiby SE, Tukwasibwe S, Knee O, Jayaraman J, Traherne JA, Elliott AM, Kaleebu P, Mirembe F, Moffett A - Immunogenetics (2013)

Bottom Line: We studied the frequencies of KIR genes and HLA-C1 and C2 groups in a large cohort (n = 492) from Kampala, Uganda, East Africa and compared our findings with published data from other populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and several European populations.C1 and C2 frequencies were similar to other SSA populations with a higher frequency of the C2 epitope (54.9 %) compared to Europe (average 39.7 %).Our results will help understand how KIR/HLA-C interactions contribute to resistance to pathogens and reproductive success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT
Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes are expressed by natural killer cells and encoded by a family of genes exhibiting considerable haplotypic and allelic variation. HLA-C molecules, the dominant ligands for KIR, are present in all individuals and are discriminated by two KIR epitopes, C1 and C2. We studied the frequencies of KIR genes and HLA-C1 and C2 groups in a large cohort (n = 492) from Kampala, Uganda, East Africa and compared our findings with published data from other populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and several European populations. We find considerably more KIR diversity and weaker linkage disequilibrium in SSA compared to the European populations and describe several novel KIR genotypes. C1 and C2 frequencies were similar to other SSA populations with a higher frequency of the C2 epitope (54.9 %) compared to Europe (average 39.7 %). Analysis of this large cohort from Uganda in the context of other African populations reveals variations in KIR and HLA-C1 and C2 that are consistent with migrations within Africa and potential selection pressures on these genes. Our results will help understand how KIR/HLA-C interactions contribute to resistance to pathogens and reproductive success.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Genotypes observed for the Ugandan population (n = 492), six other African populations from the Allele Frequency Net database (Gabon, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa San, and South Africa Xhosa, n = 354), and the UK population (n = 584), showing proportions of common and unique genotypes for each group
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824577&req=5

Fig5: Genotypes observed for the Ugandan population (n = 492), six other African populations from the Allele Frequency Net database (Gabon, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa San, and South Africa Xhosa, n = 354), and the UK population (n = 584), showing proportions of common and unique genotypes for each group

Mentions: More KIR profiles were found in the Ugandan cohort (52 genotypes) when compared to a similar sized cohort of women from the UK (40 genotypes) (Fig. 5). The two populations only shared 25 genotypes present in 72.6 % of Ugandans and 88.3 % of UK. Similarly to the six other African populations (from the Allele Frequency Net database: Gabon, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa San, and South Africa Xhosa), the Ugandan population displays a higher diversity at the genotype level, and more than a quarter of these genotypes are not observed in Europeans. Forty-eight genotypes are unique to the African populations (including Uganda) and therefore might be African genotypes that have not spread out of Africa to Europe.Fig. 5


Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and their HLA-C ligands in a Ugandan population.

Nakimuli A, Chazara O, Farrell L, Hiby SE, Tukwasibwe S, Knee O, Jayaraman J, Traherne JA, Elliott AM, Kaleebu P, Mirembe F, Moffett A - Immunogenetics (2013)

Genotypes observed for the Ugandan population (n = 492), six other African populations from the Allele Frequency Net database (Gabon, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa San, and South Africa Xhosa, n = 354), and the UK population (n = 584), showing proportions of common and unique genotypes for each group
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824577&req=5

Fig5: Genotypes observed for the Ugandan population (n = 492), six other African populations from the Allele Frequency Net database (Gabon, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa San, and South Africa Xhosa, n = 354), and the UK population (n = 584), showing proportions of common and unique genotypes for each group
Mentions: More KIR profiles were found in the Ugandan cohort (52 genotypes) when compared to a similar sized cohort of women from the UK (40 genotypes) (Fig. 5). The two populations only shared 25 genotypes present in 72.6 % of Ugandans and 88.3 % of UK. Similarly to the six other African populations (from the Allele Frequency Net database: Gabon, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa San, and South Africa Xhosa), the Ugandan population displays a higher diversity at the genotype level, and more than a quarter of these genotypes are not observed in Europeans. Forty-eight genotypes are unique to the African populations (including Uganda) and therefore might be African genotypes that have not spread out of Africa to Europe.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: We studied the frequencies of KIR genes and HLA-C1 and C2 groups in a large cohort (n = 492) from Kampala, Uganda, East Africa and compared our findings with published data from other populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and several European populations.C1 and C2 frequencies were similar to other SSA populations with a higher frequency of the C2 epitope (54.9 %) compared to Europe (average 39.7 %).Our results will help understand how KIR/HLA-C interactions contribute to resistance to pathogens and reproductive success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT
Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes are expressed by natural killer cells and encoded by a family of genes exhibiting considerable haplotypic and allelic variation. HLA-C molecules, the dominant ligands for KIR, are present in all individuals and are discriminated by two KIR epitopes, C1 and C2. We studied the frequencies of KIR genes and HLA-C1 and C2 groups in a large cohort (n = 492) from Kampala, Uganda, East Africa and compared our findings with published data from other populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and several European populations. We find considerably more KIR diversity and weaker linkage disequilibrium in SSA compared to the European populations and describe several novel KIR genotypes. C1 and C2 frequencies were similar to other SSA populations with a higher frequency of the C2 epitope (54.9 %) compared to Europe (average 39.7 %). Analysis of this large cohort from Uganda in the context of other African populations reveals variations in KIR and HLA-C1 and C2 that are consistent with migrations within Africa and potential selection pressures on these genes. Our results will help understand how KIR/HLA-C interactions contribute to resistance to pathogens and reproductive success.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus