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Archaeal and bacterial communities in three alkaline hot springs in Heart Lake Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

Bowen De León K, Gerlach R, Peyton BM, Fields MW - Front Microbiol (2013)

Bottom Line: The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44 and 63°C springs and a thermophilic community in the 75°C spring.The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined.The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different) to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Montana State University Bozeman, MT, USA ; Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University Bozeman, MT, USA.

ABSTRACT
The Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB) is remotely located at the base of Mount Sheridan in southern Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA and is situated along Witch Creek and the northwestern shore of Heart Lake. Likely because of its location, little is known about the microbial community structure of springs in the HLGB. Bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored via small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene pyrosequencing over 3 years in 3 alkaline (pH 8.5) hot springs with varying temperatures (44°C, 63°C, 75°C). The bacterial populations were generally stable over time, but varied by temperature. The dominant bacterial community changed from moderately thermophilic and photosynthetic members (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi) at 44°C to a mixed photosynthetic and thermophilic community (Deinococcus-Thermus) at 63°C and a non-photosynthetic thermophilic community at 75°C. The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44 and 63°C springs and a thermophilic community in the 75°C spring. The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined. The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different) to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Heart Lake Geyser Basin and the 3 springs selected for analysis. The HLGB (as viewed from Mount Sheridan; B) is located in the southern portion of YNP (A). The 3 springs selected were located in the Western Subgroup. The springs were at 44°C (C), 63°C (D), and 75°C (E) and all were at pH 8.5 in 2007. The image of the 44°C spring (C) was taken in 2009 and shows tears throughout the microbial mat that were not observed in 2007 or 2008.
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Figure 1: Heart Lake Geyser Basin and the 3 springs selected for analysis. The HLGB (as viewed from Mount Sheridan; B) is located in the southern portion of YNP (A). The 3 springs selected were located in the Western Subgroup. The springs were at 44°C (C), 63°C (D), and 75°C (E) and all were at pH 8.5 in 2007. The image of the 44°C spring (C) was taken in 2009 and shows tears throughout the microbial mat that were not observed in 2007 or 2008.

Mentions: Three springs were selected in the Western subgroup of the Lower HLGB with approximately the same pH (pH 8.5), but varying temperature from 44 to 75°C (Figure 1). The 44°C spring (44.29047 N, 110.50998 W) was ~5 m wide by 1 m deep (measured near an abrupt edge) with a steeply sloping edge, little or no thermal gradient, and contained a thick (1–2 cm) red and green microbial mat. The effluent of the spring flowed into a small stream consisting of effluent from distal springs, which combines with a spring at 63°C (44.29068 N, 110.50983 W) at a bend in the stream, forming an eddy ~1.5 m wide by 1 m deep. Near the effluent of the 63°C spring, a thin, green microbial mat covered a thick, loose black layer of organic matter. A third spring at 75°C (44.29047 N, 110.50987 W), in close proximity to these springs but not connected by surface hydrology, was ~2 m wide, >4 m deep, with an abrupt edge and no visible biomass. The 44, 63, and 75°C springs were identified as HLW028, HLW004, and HLW009, respectively, from the YNP Thermal Inventory according to GPS coordinates and photographs. The YNP Thermal Inventory was provided by the YNP Spatial Analysis Center and made available by the National Science Foundation YNP Research Coordination Network (www.rcn.montana.edu).


Archaeal and bacterial communities in three alkaline hot springs in Heart Lake Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

Bowen De León K, Gerlach R, Peyton BM, Fields MW - Front Microbiol (2013)

Heart Lake Geyser Basin and the 3 springs selected for analysis. The HLGB (as viewed from Mount Sheridan; B) is located in the southern portion of YNP (A). The 3 springs selected were located in the Western Subgroup. The springs were at 44°C (C), 63°C (D), and 75°C (E) and all were at pH 8.5 in 2007. The image of the 44°C spring (C) was taken in 2009 and shows tears throughout the microbial mat that were not observed in 2007 or 2008.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824361&req=5

Figure 1: Heart Lake Geyser Basin and the 3 springs selected for analysis. The HLGB (as viewed from Mount Sheridan; B) is located in the southern portion of YNP (A). The 3 springs selected were located in the Western Subgroup. The springs were at 44°C (C), 63°C (D), and 75°C (E) and all were at pH 8.5 in 2007. The image of the 44°C spring (C) was taken in 2009 and shows tears throughout the microbial mat that were not observed in 2007 or 2008.
Mentions: Three springs were selected in the Western subgroup of the Lower HLGB with approximately the same pH (pH 8.5), but varying temperature from 44 to 75°C (Figure 1). The 44°C spring (44.29047 N, 110.50998 W) was ~5 m wide by 1 m deep (measured near an abrupt edge) with a steeply sloping edge, little or no thermal gradient, and contained a thick (1–2 cm) red and green microbial mat. The effluent of the spring flowed into a small stream consisting of effluent from distal springs, which combines with a spring at 63°C (44.29068 N, 110.50983 W) at a bend in the stream, forming an eddy ~1.5 m wide by 1 m deep. Near the effluent of the 63°C spring, a thin, green microbial mat covered a thick, loose black layer of organic matter. A third spring at 75°C (44.29047 N, 110.50987 W), in close proximity to these springs but not connected by surface hydrology, was ~2 m wide, >4 m deep, with an abrupt edge and no visible biomass. The 44, 63, and 75°C springs were identified as HLW028, HLW004, and HLW009, respectively, from the YNP Thermal Inventory according to GPS coordinates and photographs. The YNP Thermal Inventory was provided by the YNP Spatial Analysis Center and made available by the National Science Foundation YNP Research Coordination Network (www.rcn.montana.edu).

Bottom Line: The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44 and 63°C springs and a thermophilic community in the 75°C spring.The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined.The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different) to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Montana State University Bozeman, MT, USA ; Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University Bozeman, MT, USA.

ABSTRACT
The Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB) is remotely located at the base of Mount Sheridan in southern Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA and is situated along Witch Creek and the northwestern shore of Heart Lake. Likely because of its location, little is known about the microbial community structure of springs in the HLGB. Bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored via small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene pyrosequencing over 3 years in 3 alkaline (pH 8.5) hot springs with varying temperatures (44°C, 63°C, 75°C). The bacterial populations were generally stable over time, but varied by temperature. The dominant bacterial community changed from moderately thermophilic and photosynthetic members (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi) at 44°C to a mixed photosynthetic and thermophilic community (Deinococcus-Thermus) at 63°C and a non-photosynthetic thermophilic community at 75°C. The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44 and 63°C springs and a thermophilic community in the 75°C spring. The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined. The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different) to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus