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Noradrenergic versus dopaminergic modulation of impulsivity, attention and monitoring behaviour in rats performing the stop-signal task: possible relevance to ADHD.

Bari A, Robbins TW - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) (2013)

Bottom Line: The results are described in terms of the effects of modulating specific receptor subtypes on various behavioural measures such as response inhibition, perseveration, sustained attention, error monitoring and motivation.No relevant effects were obtained after targeting DA D1, D2 or D4 receptors, while both a D3 receptor agonist and antagonist improved post-error slowing and compulsive nose-poke behaviour, though generally impairing other task measures.Our results suggest that the use of specific pharmacological agents targeting α2 and β noradrenergic receptors may improve existing treatments for attentional deficits and impulsivity, whereas DA D3 receptors may modulate error monitoring and perseverative behaviour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK, andbari@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Deficient response inhibition is a prominent feature of many pathological conditions characterised by impulsive and compulsive behaviour. Clinically effective doses of catecholamine reuptake inhibitors are able to improve such inhibitory deficits as measured by the stop-signal task (SST) in humans and other animals. However, the precise therapeutic mode of action of these compounds in terms of their relative effects on dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) systems in prefrontal cortical and striatal regions mediating attention and cognitive control remains unclear.

Objectives: We sought to fractionate the effects of global catecholaminergic manipulations on SST performance by using receptor-specific compounds for NA or DA. The results are described in terms of the effects of modulating specific receptor subtypes on various behavioural measures such as response inhibition, perseveration, sustained attention, error monitoring and motivation.

Results: Blockade of α2-adrenoceptors improved sustained attention and response inhibition, whereas α1 and β1/2 adrenergic receptor antagonists disrupted go performance and sustained attention, respectively. No relevant effects were obtained after targeting DA D1, D2 or D4 receptors, while both a D3 receptor agonist and antagonist improved post-error slowing and compulsive nose-poke behaviour, though generally impairing other task measures.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the use of specific pharmacological agents targeting α2 and β noradrenergic receptors may improve existing treatments for attentional deficits and impulsivity, whereas DA D3 receptors may modulate error monitoring and perseverative behaviour.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Propranolol (β 1/2 antagonist) administration caused only a significant main effect on mRT and go accuracy without affecting SSRT or stop accuracy
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig4: Propranolol (β 1/2 antagonist) administration caused only a significant main effect on mRT and go accuracy without affecting SSRT or stop accuracy

Mentions: There was no effect of propranolol on SSRT (F(3,30) = 2.16, ns; Fig. 4) and stop accuracy (F(3,30) = 0.05, ns). mRT was significantly affected by the drug (F(3,30) = 3.41, p < 0.05), but pairwise comparisons reported no significant differences between doses. There was also a significant main effect on go accuracy (F(3,30) = 3.51, p < 0.05), but no significant differences after correcting for multiple comparisons. Propranolol significantly affected SDGoRT (F(3,30) = 3.82, p < 0.05; Table 1) and pairwise comparisons showed that it was higher after the 3 mg/kg dose, compared with the vehicle condition (p < 0.05). There was no effect on PES (F(3,26) = 0.3, ns), NP/TO (F(3,30) = 1.63, ns) and RCL (F(2,20) = 0.31, ns).Fig. 4


Noradrenergic versus dopaminergic modulation of impulsivity, attention and monitoring behaviour in rats performing the stop-signal task: possible relevance to ADHD.

Bari A, Robbins TW - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) (2013)

Propranolol (β 1/2 antagonist) administration caused only a significant main effect on mRT and go accuracy without affecting SSRT or stop accuracy
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824307&req=5

Fig4: Propranolol (β 1/2 antagonist) administration caused only a significant main effect on mRT and go accuracy without affecting SSRT or stop accuracy
Mentions: There was no effect of propranolol on SSRT (F(3,30) = 2.16, ns; Fig. 4) and stop accuracy (F(3,30) = 0.05, ns). mRT was significantly affected by the drug (F(3,30) = 3.41, p < 0.05), but pairwise comparisons reported no significant differences between doses. There was also a significant main effect on go accuracy (F(3,30) = 3.51, p < 0.05), but no significant differences after correcting for multiple comparisons. Propranolol significantly affected SDGoRT (F(3,30) = 3.82, p < 0.05; Table 1) and pairwise comparisons showed that it was higher after the 3 mg/kg dose, compared with the vehicle condition (p < 0.05). There was no effect on PES (F(3,26) = 0.3, ns), NP/TO (F(3,30) = 1.63, ns) and RCL (F(2,20) = 0.31, ns).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: The results are described in terms of the effects of modulating specific receptor subtypes on various behavioural measures such as response inhibition, perseveration, sustained attention, error monitoring and motivation.No relevant effects were obtained after targeting DA D1, D2 or D4 receptors, while both a D3 receptor agonist and antagonist improved post-error slowing and compulsive nose-poke behaviour, though generally impairing other task measures.Our results suggest that the use of specific pharmacological agents targeting α2 and β noradrenergic receptors may improve existing treatments for attentional deficits and impulsivity, whereas DA D3 receptors may modulate error monitoring and perseverative behaviour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK, andbari@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Deficient response inhibition is a prominent feature of many pathological conditions characterised by impulsive and compulsive behaviour. Clinically effective doses of catecholamine reuptake inhibitors are able to improve such inhibitory deficits as measured by the stop-signal task (SST) in humans and other animals. However, the precise therapeutic mode of action of these compounds in terms of their relative effects on dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) systems in prefrontal cortical and striatal regions mediating attention and cognitive control remains unclear.

Objectives: We sought to fractionate the effects of global catecholaminergic manipulations on SST performance by using receptor-specific compounds for NA or DA. The results are described in terms of the effects of modulating specific receptor subtypes on various behavioural measures such as response inhibition, perseveration, sustained attention, error monitoring and motivation.

Results: Blockade of α2-adrenoceptors improved sustained attention and response inhibition, whereas α1 and β1/2 adrenergic receptor antagonists disrupted go performance and sustained attention, respectively. No relevant effects were obtained after targeting DA D1, D2 or D4 receptors, while both a D3 receptor agonist and antagonist improved post-error slowing and compulsive nose-poke behaviour, though generally impairing other task measures.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the use of specific pharmacological agents targeting α2 and β noradrenergic receptors may improve existing treatments for attentional deficits and impulsivity, whereas DA D3 receptors may modulate error monitoring and perseverative behaviour.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus