Limits...
The pathogenicity of the Streptococcus genus.

Krzyściak W, Pluskwa KK, Jurczak A, Kościelniak D - Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. (2013)

Bottom Line: As the World Health Organization (WHO) warns, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for the highest number of pneumonia cases all over the world.Unfortunately, the pathogenicity of bacteria of the Streptococcus genus is also connected to species considered to be physiological flora in humans or animals and, additionally, new species exhibiting pathogenic potential have been discovered.This paper presents an opinion concerning the epidemiology of streptococci infections based on case studies and other publications devoted to this problem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Diagnostics, Pharmacy Faculty, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 9 Medyczna St., 30-688, Krakow, Poland, wirginiakrzysciak@cm-uj.krakow.pl.

ABSTRACT
Streptococcus infections are still one of the important problems facing contemporary medicine. As the World Health Organization (WHO) warns, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for the highest number of pneumonia cases all over the world. Despite an increasing number of pneumococcal vaccinations, incidences of disease connected to this pathogen's infection stay at the same level, which is related to a constantly increasing number of infections caused by nonvaccinal serotypes. Unfortunately, the pathogenicity of bacteria of the Streptococcus genus is also connected to species considered to be physiological flora in humans or animals and, additionally, new species exhibiting pathogenic potential have been discovered. This paper presents an opinion concerning the epidemiology of streptococci infections based on case studies and other publications devoted to this problem. It also sheds new light based on recent reports on the prevention of protective vaccinations application in the case of streptococci infections.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae over the years in Europe, using Denmark as an example. The diagram was prepared based on the studies of Harboe et al. [76] and Ingels et al. [77]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824240&req=5

Fig2: Number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae over the years in Europe, using Denmark as an example. The diagram was prepared based on the studies of Harboe et al. [76] and Ingels et al. [77]

Mentions: The next significant reason for diseases occurrence and mortality all over the world is invasive GAS infections. S. pyogenes is responsible for ca. 700 million infections each year, causing about 500,000 deaths [11]. In Europe, they are noted with varying frequencies per 100,000 people: 3.12 cases in Great Britain [72]; 3.1 in France [73]; as much as 3.9 in Finland [74]. The mortality rate as a result of GAS infection in these countries is 19, 14, and 9 %, respectively. In the United States, the frequency of invasive GAS infections is similar: 3.5 cases per 100,000 people, with a mortality rate of 12.5 % [75] (see Fig. 2). GAS strains are concurrently responsible for ca. 18 million cases of rheumatic heart disease. resulting in a death of ca. 500,000 people each year. A considerable relationship between GAS strains causing pharyngitis in children and the strains related to invasive disease in society was also observed. These data suggest that schoolchildren may constitute a reservoir of infections for society [78–80].Fig. 2


The pathogenicity of the Streptococcus genus.

Krzyściak W, Pluskwa KK, Jurczak A, Kościelniak D - Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. (2013)

Number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae over the years in Europe, using Denmark as an example. The diagram was prepared based on the studies of Harboe et al. [76] and Ingels et al. [77]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824240&req=5

Fig2: Number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae over the years in Europe, using Denmark as an example. The diagram was prepared based on the studies of Harboe et al. [76] and Ingels et al. [77]
Mentions: The next significant reason for diseases occurrence and mortality all over the world is invasive GAS infections. S. pyogenes is responsible for ca. 700 million infections each year, causing about 500,000 deaths [11]. In Europe, they are noted with varying frequencies per 100,000 people: 3.12 cases in Great Britain [72]; 3.1 in France [73]; as much as 3.9 in Finland [74]. The mortality rate as a result of GAS infection in these countries is 19, 14, and 9 %, respectively. In the United States, the frequency of invasive GAS infections is similar: 3.5 cases per 100,000 people, with a mortality rate of 12.5 % [75] (see Fig. 2). GAS strains are concurrently responsible for ca. 18 million cases of rheumatic heart disease. resulting in a death of ca. 500,000 people each year. A considerable relationship between GAS strains causing pharyngitis in children and the strains related to invasive disease in society was also observed. These data suggest that schoolchildren may constitute a reservoir of infections for society [78–80].Fig. 2

Bottom Line: As the World Health Organization (WHO) warns, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for the highest number of pneumonia cases all over the world.Unfortunately, the pathogenicity of bacteria of the Streptococcus genus is also connected to species considered to be physiological flora in humans or animals and, additionally, new species exhibiting pathogenic potential have been discovered.This paper presents an opinion concerning the epidemiology of streptococci infections based on case studies and other publications devoted to this problem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Diagnostics, Pharmacy Faculty, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 9 Medyczna St., 30-688, Krakow, Poland, wirginiakrzysciak@cm-uj.krakow.pl.

ABSTRACT
Streptococcus infections are still one of the important problems facing contemporary medicine. As the World Health Organization (WHO) warns, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for the highest number of pneumonia cases all over the world. Despite an increasing number of pneumococcal vaccinations, incidences of disease connected to this pathogen's infection stay at the same level, which is related to a constantly increasing number of infections caused by nonvaccinal serotypes. Unfortunately, the pathogenicity of bacteria of the Streptococcus genus is also connected to species considered to be physiological flora in humans or animals and, additionally, new species exhibiting pathogenic potential have been discovered. This paper presents an opinion concerning the epidemiology of streptococci infections based on case studies and other publications devoted to this problem. It also sheds new light based on recent reports on the prevention of protective vaccinations application in the case of streptococci infections.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus